junkie


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adrenaline junkie

One who constantly seeks out the sudden increase of energy associated with dangerous activities, similar to the way drug addicts seek out the "high" achieved by drug use. I do about 10 skydives a year because I love the rush so much. People consider me a bit of an adrenaline junkie.
See also: adrenaline, junkie

junkie

1. slang A drug addict, especially of heroin. I dabbled with drugs near the end of high school, but I turned into a full-blown junkie after I graduated. That part of town is filled with junkies, so I wouldn't go there if you don't have to.
2. slang Anyone with an obsession over or excessive preoccupation with something, akin to an addiction. I've become something of a retro video game junkie over the last few years. I've put an admittedly absurd amount of time and money into my collection. I do about 10 skydives a year because I love the rush so much. People consider me a bit of an adrenaline junkie.

junkie

and junky (ˈdʒəŋki)
1. n. a drug dealer. (Drugs.) Junkies should be put into the jug.
2. n. a drug user; an addict. (Drugs.) Junkies have to steal to support their habits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Across the UK, more than 2,000 junior junkies have been born in the last five years.
Contact: Joe Brown, creative director of Media Junkies
Most of the reporters and editors I polled said they had no problem with the word junkie, especially in a newspaper column, where we're allowed more leeway to use casual language.
The single, “Jukebox Junkie,” was a smashing hit and continued to receive airplay for the remainder of the decade.
Digital Junkie offers a number of services including social marketing, web design and e-commerce.
In a reference to the way junkies smoke crack, Pete and Amy will sing 'I'm pipin' almost every night; I watch my dreams float by .
The store will be Bath Junkie's flagship New York location
Writing for the "crime junkies" who make up the audience for fictional and nonfictional television crime dramas, Silver, a former Assistant US Attorney, draws on actual trials as well as plots and characters from popular TV shows to illustrate issues in criminal law, such as degrees of murder, the defense of intoxication, search warrants, insanity pleas, and the purposes of pretrial hearings.
But you don't have to be a political junkie to see Charlie's name all over the place.
The photographs, in this week's Closer magazine, show how heroin turned the fresh-faced schoolgirl into a haunted junkie.
STARTUP JUNKIE UNDERGROUND IS A monthly gathering of entrepreneurs, inventors and dreamers who are serious about their ideas but don't take themselves too seriously.
Fashion photographers are bringing us that "junkie look." As an advertising exec might say, "Smack Is Back." I guess every generation has to make its own mistakes.
Speaking at the Association of American Law Schools' annual meeting in San Antonio, Texas, Kapor gave the example of a computer science professor at the University of Pennsylvania who is an electronic mail "junkie." He takes the most interesting material he receives and passes it along to a select group of 400 computer opinion-leaders, who rely on it to stay up to date on developments in the industry.
In his first book, Junkie: Confessions of an Unredeemed Drug Addict (1953), Burroughs adopted the name "William Lee" to report some of his drug years, which were not yet past.