juncture

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Related to junctures: imperiously, yammered

at this point

At the present moment; right now; currently. At this point, we are the best ranked football team in the country.
See also: point, this

at this juncture

At this time. They still haven't reached a decision, so I can't comment on anything at this juncture. At this juncture, we're going to my mother's for Thanksgiving dinner, but things could change between now and Thursday.
See also: juncture, this

at this juncture

at this point; at this pause. There is little more that I can say at this juncture. We can, if you wish, at this juncture, request a change in venue.
See also: juncture, this

at this point

Also, at this point in time or at this juncture or at this moment . Now, as in At this point in time we don't need a new refrigerator. Even wordier synonyms for "now" than at present, all four phrases imply that what is the case now may not always have been so or may not remain so. For example, At this point she is by far the best athlete on the circuit implies that she may not have been the best in the past or may not be in the future. Similarly, Buying a new car seems prudent at this juncture indicates that this purchase may not have been wise in the past and may not be at some future time. Also see at that point.
See also: point, this
References in periodicals archive ?
For this purpose, the concept of critical juncture is introduced since it allows for a fresh perspective by zooming in on individual, imaginative qualities and broader, often unexpected, transformations which are a result of both historical processes and cultural actors' creativity on different scales.
In the following, we first introduce the concept of critical juncture which, we want to argue, allows for a fresh perspective by zooming in on individual, innovative qualities and broader, often unexpected, changes which are a result of both historical processes and cultural actors' creativity on different scales.
More specifically, the issue proposes, and critically interrogates, the concept of critical juncture as a new angle on the relationship between anthropological and historical methodologies, arguing that it facilitates a 'double historicizing' (Appadurai 1996) that works through the dialectic between broader historical forces and specific genealogies by being simultaneously attentive to the long duree of life worlds or cultural continuity, such as Indigenous historicities (Ballard 2014; Hau'ofa 2008; Sullivan 2005; see Ritchie's article), as well as the impact of critical moments, such as climate change, on the (re)configuration of these life worlds within cultural-geographic spaces (Clifford 1997; Flood 2009; Schorch and Durr 2016).
One recent example that can be helpful to illustrate the potential of critical juncture as a conceptual and analytical lens is the anthropological study of climate change.
This would entail treating climate change as a critical juncture which allows us to focus on actors' decisions on how to deal with it, as well as on the resulting cultural processes, including the transformation of ontological principles.
JUNCTURE CONSIDERATION IN VOCAL MUSIC in vocal music
The handling of phonetic events at juncture points, consciously or intuitively, is a key element in the rhetorical persuasiveness of text declamation.
Text underlay simply syllabifies words, indicating merely which notes are sung on which vowel(s), and which consonants and glides occupy the juncture moments "between" notes, as it were.
The syllabification of the juncture consonant cluster is usually determined by phonotactic and morphological rules.
8) The perhaps surprising conclusion to be drawn is this: all juncture consonants in singing should be regarded as anticipatory to the beat, regardless of which syllable they belong to orthographically or phonetically.
In order to probe further into English juncture in vocal music, a list of sample words has been compiled.
In any event, the vowels are less of a consideration for present purposes than the consonant clusters found at juncture points.
While the lists involving only C and V are comprehensive regarding possible combinations, the examples involving juncture diphthongs are not, and are simply examples as found in the sources.
V\CV is the most commonly encountered juncture in English, and is straightforward in execution.
The three V\CCV words are each different from one another, in that the juncture cluster of astonished begins with an unvoiced fricative, that of regret with a voiced plosive, and that of clutching with an unvoiced plosive that initiates an affricate, [tB].