jump on the bandwagon

jump on the bandwagon

To join or follow something once it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just jump on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she decided to jump on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, jump, on

jump on the bandwagon

COMMON If someone jumps on the bandwagon, they suddenly become involved in an activity because it is likely to succeed or it is fashionable. There will always be people ready to jump on the bandwagon and start classes in whatever is fashionable, with little or no training. Why are so many stars now jumping on the fashionable green bandwagon?. Note: Verbs such as climb, get, leap and join are sometimes used instead of jump. A lot of people are climbing on the bandwagon of selling financial services to women. Note: These expressions are usually used in a disapproving way. Note: You can also say that someone is bandwagon-jumping. We welcome any campaign on safety issues, but we don't like the bandwagon-jumping of this organization. Note: Bandwagon is also used in other phrases such as someone's bandwagon is rolling, to mean that an activity or movement is getting increasing support. Major's team believe his bandwagon is rolling with support coming from both sides of the party. Note: In American elections in the past, political rallies often included a band playing on a horse-drawn wagon (= a covered vehicle pulled by horses). Politicians sat on the wagon and those who wanted to show their support climbed on it.
See also: bandwagon, jump, on

jump on the bandwagon

join others in doing something or supporting a cause that is fashionable or likely to be successful.
Bandwagon was originally the US term for a large wagon able to carry a band of musicians in a procession.
See also: bandwagon, jump, on

climb/jump on the ˈbandwagon

(informal, disapproving) do something that others are already doing because it is successful or fashionable: As soon as their policies became popular, all the other parties started to climb on the bandwagon.At political celebrations in the USA, there was often a band on a large decorated vehicle (= a bandwagon). If somebody joined a particular ‘bandwagon’, they publicly supported that politician in order to benefit from their success.
See also: bandwagon, climb, jump, on
References in periodicals archive ?
META Group predicts the contextual advertising market will reach $5 billion by 2006, as more providers continue to jump on the bandwagon.
Jump on the bandwagon now because it's ours to lose.
He will address broadband from an online perspective, discussing how the industry is preparing and how organizations can jump on the bandwagon.
People are eager to jump on the bandwagon,'' Dunlap said.
But they didn't realize their ingenious concept of fresh, tortilla-wrapped, multi-cultural cuisine would inspire so many copycats to jump on the bandwagon.
Sorry, but I won't jump on the bandwagon in this insistence to deify Michael Jordan.
As more companies jump on the bandwagon, having such a suffix could make a business look as dated as a rotary phone, experts warn.