jumble together

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jumble together

1. To combine people or things at random. A noun or pronoun can be used between "jumble" and "together." You can't just jumble everyone in the family together at Thanksgiving dinner—a lot of them don't get along. I hadn't been expecting company, so I jumbled together some snacks for the kids and hoped for the best.
2. To construct something shoddily. Yikes, this old car sounds like it was just jumbled together by the mechanic.
See also: jumble, together

jumble someone or something together

to mix people or things together randomly into a hodgepodge. They just jumbled everything together and made a real mess. The army just jumbled everybody together, no matter what their skills and talents were.
See also: jumble, together

jumble something together

to assemble something clumsily and hastily. They just jumbled some holiday decorations together. It really wasn't very well done. I hope this airplane wasn't jumbled together as badly as this meal.
See also: jumble, together
References in classic literature ?
Now what a radical reversal of things this was; what a jumbling together of extravagant incongruities; what a fantastic conjunction of opposites and irreconcilables -- the home of the bogus miracle become the home of a real one, the den of a mediaeval hermit turned into a telephone office!
Famous for their "Rockney" style, the two have been entertaining crowds since the 1970s with tunes once described by the Independent as jumbling together "pub singalong, music hall humour, boogie-woogie piano, and pre-Beatles rock'n'roll." Already experienced artists in their own right, pianist Chas Hodges and guitarist Dave Peacock teamed together with drummer Mick Burtin in 1975, releasing their debut album, One Fing 'n' Anuvver, the same year.
The joy is in the author's depth of thought her poetic descriptions the jumbling together of images and the sense she makes out of all these elements.
Jumbling together a mishmash of Biblical prophecy, pagan legend, Papal conspiracy, alchemy, modern technology and genetic science with flashbacks taking in the Crucifixion and Crusaders, its conclusion is rather chillingly clever as a sort of Omen for the 21st century.
Nikolaus Pevsner wrote of the nineteenth century's "new faith in humanism, its great respect for Bildung and its new democracy of learning." The capital of the "democracy of learning" was London, its urbanism characterized by the jumbling together of its humanistic institutions and the more quotidian functions of the metropolis.