juiced


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juice

1. noun, slang Electricity. I tried plugging the machine into the wall, but there was no juice coming out of the outlet.
2. noun, slang Alcohol, especially wine or a distilled liquor. We've got to make sure we have enough juice to make cocktails for everyone.
3. noun, slang Fuel for an engine. A: "We're just not getting up to speed." B: "Are you giving it enough juice?"
4. noun, slang Performance-enhancing drugs, especially anabolic steroids. At first, I only used the juice once in a while to give my workout a bit of a boost, but by the end of the year I was a total juice freak.
5. verb, slang To use performance-enhancing drugs, especially anabolic steroids. You could tell the guy juices from his grotesquely muscular physique. The athlete was suspected of juicing for most of his career.

juice (someone or something) back to life

To restore power or energy to someone or something. I was feeling pretty sluggish after I woke up, but that coffee really juiced me back to life. The car battery died, so I had to get my neighbor to come juice it back to life for me.
See also: back, juice, life, to

juice (someone or something) back up

To restore power or energy to someone or something. I was feeling pretty sluggish after I got out of bed, but that coffee really juiced me back up. The car battery died, so I had to get my neighbor to come juice it back up for me.
See also: back, juice, up

juice up

1. slang To change or make an addition to something to make it livelier, more powerful, or more effective. A noun or pronoun can be used between "juice" and "up." He has spent months juicing up his hot rod—you should hear that thing roar. I think we need to juice up our cover art a little. Right now it reads a little bland.
2. slang To get or become drunk. After college, I realized I had to stop juicing up at every opportunity. She got juiced up at the reception and started making a scene.
3. slang To use anabolic steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs. You could tell he's been juicing up, judging by his grotesquely muscular physique. I juice up occasionally to help boost my performance at the gym, but I still put in a lot of hard work. The athlete was suspected of juicing up for most of his career.
See also: juice, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

juice something up

 
1. Sl. to make something more powerful. How much did it cost to juice this thing up? Wally juiced up his car.
2. Sl. to turn on the electricity to something. It's time to juice the stage lights up. Juice up the stage lights.
See also: juice, up

juice up

Sl. to drink one or more alcoholic drinks. Hey, man, let's go out and juice up tonight. Stop juicing up every night.
See also: juice, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

juice up

1. Give something energy, spirit, or interest. For example, They tried to juice up the party by playing loud music.
2. Change something to improve its performance, as in That old jeep's motor got juiced up in the shop, or Lowering interest rates is one way to juice up the economy. [Slang; second half of 1900s]
See also: juice, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

juice up

v. Slang
1. To make something more interesting or lively: The writers juiced up the plot line. The comedian juiced his act up.
2. To make something more powerful: I juiced up the punch with more rum. We need to juice the engine up with a tune-up.
3. To drink to the point of intoxication: The clients juiced up at the bar after the conference.
4. To become drunk. Used in the passive: He got juiced up on cheap wine last night.
See also: juice, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

juice

1. n. liquor; wine. Let’s go get some juice and get stewed.
2. in. to drink heavily. Both of them were really juicing.
3. n. electricity. Turn on the juice, and let’s see if it runs.
4. n. energy; power; political influence. Dave left the president’s staff because he just didn’t have the juice anymore to be useful.
5. n. orange juice futures market. (Securities markets. Usually with the.) The juice opened a little high today, but fell quickly under profit taking.
6. n. anabolic steroids. Fred used too much juice and is growing witch tits.

juice up

in. to drink one or more alcoholic drinks. Hey, man, let’s go out and juice up tonight.
See also: juice, up
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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