jugular


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to jugular: jugular pulse

go for the jugular

To attack in the most aggresive way possible or where the victim is most vulnerable. Despite the imagery, the term is almost never used to refer to physical violence. (The jugular is a vein in the neck that transports blood between the head and the heart, and is a common target for some predators.) If you want to go for the jugular against your opponent, I have some damaging information you might be interested in.
See also: go, jugular

go for someone or something

 
1. Lit. to go out for someone or something; to go fetch someone or something. I am going for bread—do we need anything else from the store? Roger went for his aunt, who had arrived at the station.
2. Fig. to find someone or something interesting or desirable. I really go for chocolate in any form. Tom really goes for Gloria in a big way.
3. . Fig. to believe or accept something or something that someone says. It sounds pretty strange. Do you think they'll go for it?
See also: go

go for

1. Go in order to get, as in I'll go for the paper, or He went for the doctor. This usage, dating from the late 1500s, gave rise to the 20th-century noun gofer, a person who is habitually sent on routine errands.
2. Be equivalent to or valued as; also, pass for, serve as. For example, All our efforts are going for very little, or That silver went for a lot of money, or That sofa can go for a bed. [Mid-1500s]
3. Aim or try for, especially making a vigorous effort. For example, They're going for the league championship. This idiom is also put as go for it, as in When Steve said he'd like to change careers, his wife told him to go for it. The related phrase go for broke means "to commit all one's available resources toward achieving a goal," as in Our competitors are going for broke to get some of our accounts. The first expression dates from the mid-1500s; the two colloquial variants from the first half of the 1900s. Also see all out; go out for.
4. Attack, as in We have to tie up our dog, because he loves to go for letter carriers. A hyperbolic variant, go for the jugular, is used for an all-out attack on the most vital part, as in In political arguments he always goes for the jugular. The jugular is a blood vessel whose rupture is life-threatening. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
5. Have a special liking for, as in I really go for progressive jazz. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]
6. Be valid for or applicable to, as in Kevin hates broccoli, and that goes for Dean, too. [Early 1900s] Also see have going for one.
See also: go

go for the jugular

COMMON If someone goes for the jugular, they attack or criticize someone very severely, causing the most damage or biggest defeat possible. In fact, the 29-year-old Italian won just four points in the whole set as his opponent went for the jugular. Both newpapers went for the jugular yesterday in fierce attacks on the senator. Note: You can also say that someone goes for the throat. She decided to forget about charming him and go for the throat. Note: The jugular vein is a large vein in the neck and supplies blood to the neck and face.
See also: go, jugular

go for the jugular

be aggressive or unrestrained in making an attack.
1997 Cosmopolitan Once she decides she wants a man, she goes for the jugular and doesn't give a hoot about any other woman (such as his girlfriend).
See also: go, jugular

go for the ˈjugular

(informal) attack somebody’s weakest point during a discussion in an aggressive way: Harry decided that there was no point trying to be nice to these people — he would have to go straight for the jugular.
The jugular vein is a large vein in the neck that carries blood from the head to the heart.
See also: go, jugular

go for

v.
1. To reach or move toward something or someone: When the police officer looked away, the thief went for the door.
2. To reach or move toward something or someone in order to attack or injure: The angry dog went straight for my leg. The debater went for her opponents weaknesses.
3. To try to grab something quickly, especially a weapon: The soldier went for the knife on the table, but slipped and fell down.
4. To make a concerted effort to achieve some goal: I am going for my second tournament win. If you think you have a chance of winning, go for it. The running back saw an opening and went for it. Whenever I see an opportunity to make more money, I go for it.
5. To try to attain or produce some condition: The restaurant is going for a rustic atmosphere. Today's fashions are going for a colorful look.
6. To choose something: After trying all the different flavors, I went for the vanilla ice cream.
7. To have a special liking for something; enjoy something: My parents go for the older styles of jazz. I could really go for a beer right now.
8. To leave temporarily in order to fetch or get something: We're going for pizza; do you want to come along?
9. To apply or be relevant to someone or something: These rules go for the adults as well as the children. It's hard to eat pizza without making a mess, and the same goes for ice cream cones.
10. To be sold or available for purchase at some price: This phone normally goes for $100, but we'll give it to you for $60. How much did that old house finally go for? That painting will probably go for $1000 at auction, but I wouldn't pay one cent.
11. To be of support or value to someone: She had everything going for her after the success of her last album, but she threw it all away on drugs and alcohol. The team has a lot going for them. The one thing going for him is his talent for making people laugh; otherwise he's a failure.
See also: go
References in periodicals archive ?
Advantages of right internal jugular vein cannulation relate to the fact that it has got good external landmarks, its consistent and predictable anatomic location, its valve-less course to the superior vena cava and right atrium.
On deep dissection, the projectile was found to have passed through left sternocleidomastoid muscle, both anterior and posterior walls of the internal jugular vein, and impacted into the paravertebral fascia.
A symptomatic high-riding jugular bulb presents a therapeutic challenge.
However, IMA pseudoaneurysms have been reported after subclavian line placements or internal jugular catheterization.[sup][4] This unique location coupled with the dynamic motion of the chest wall and the relative lack of surrounding supporting tissue creates an ideal environment for the growth and possible rupture of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the IMA.
The tympanic branches of 9th and 10th cranial nerves also pass through jugular foramen.
Anatomical variations of internal jugular vein as seen by "Site Rite II" ultrasound machine-an initial experience in Pakistani population.
Differential diagnosis of lesions in the jugular foramen include: meningiomas, glomus jugulare tumors, juguluar diverticulum, jugular parangliomas, vestibular schwannomas and metastasis, among others.
Venous aneurysm of the neck commonly involves the internal jugular vein.
Head rotation during internal jugular vein cannulation and the risk of carotid artery puncture.
A bony defect was observed in the right jugular fossa.
BLUES have to 'go for the jugular' and not wait for things to happen.
We describe a method for CVC at the supraclavicular region using a needle with an in-plane ultrasound imaging approach (using the needle parallel to the ultrasound beam) with a semi-axial view of the internal jugular vein.
A DAD narrowly missed having his jugular severed when he was bottled during his 25th wedding anniversary celebrations.
A TEENAGER who nearly sliced an innocent young woman's jugular when he smashed a glass into her face has been locked up.