jostle

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jostle around

1. To shake, knock, or rattle against one another within some space. Make sure those bottles are all secured tightly. I don't want them jostling around during transit. We all jostled around in the back of the van as it wound back and forth along the mountain road.
2. To push, knock, or rattle someone or something around. In this usage, a noun or a pronoun can be used between "jostle" and "around." Now, make sure you don't jostle around the stuff inside this container, or it could explode! Various protestors and reporters kept jostling me around as I tried to make my way to the courtroom.
3. To exist in a fleeting, chaotic, or inchoate manner, especially within one's mind. I've had the idea for a novel jostling around in my head for the last couple of years, but I've never sat down to start writing it. Memories of the previous night jostled around in a hungover blur.
See also: around, jostle

jostle aside

1. To push, shove, or elbow someone to one side. A noun or a pronoun can be used between "jostle" and "aside." Please don't jostle aside the other customers—wait your turn like everyone else. Some jerk kept jostling people aside as he made his way to the front of the crowd.
2. To take by force the prominent position previously held by someone or some group. A noun or a pronoun can be used between "jostle" and "aside." The country has jostled aside the dominant nations over the years to become the most powerful economy in the world. The environment is jostling the jobless rate aside as the topic most hotly debated by campaigning politicians.
See also: aside, jostle

jostle with (someone or something)

1. To struggle, wrestle, or grapple with someone or some group. The bouncer jostled with the unruly customer, eventually managing to throw him out into the alley behind the bar. I hate having to jostle with big crowds, so I usually travel to places in their off season.
2. To compete or contend with someone or some group in order to attain some benefit, advantage, or position. I'd love that promotion, but I know I'll be jostling with about 10 other people in our department to get it. The small kingdom has been jostling with three other nations for control over the region.
See also: jostle

jostle someone around

to push or knock someone around. Please don't jostle me around. Don't jostle around everyone!
See also: around, jostle

jostle someone aside

to push or nudge someone aside. Poor little Timmy was jostled aside by the crowd every time he got near the entrance. The big kids jostled aside all the little ones.
See also: aside, jostle

jostle with someone

to struggle with someone. Andy jostled with Fred for access to the door. Timmy and Bobby jostled with one another while they were waiting to get in.
See also: jostle
References in periodicals archive ?
Require non-crashing jostles. For example, AM can be converted only to FA, LA, MA, ME, MI, MY or PA.
At least with regard to lethal violence, the bellicose, aggressive world of the working-class bar was under siege, and male-on-male homicides in Chicago no longer tended to occur in saloons, to be sparked by trivial jostles and reckless challenges, or to begin "on the border of snakeland." Wild young men did not disappear from local society, but they felt less inclination to prove their masculinity in deadly drunken brawls.
In the play, a range of constructions of sexuality jostles for prominence, an insight that allows Callaghan to read "desire," and its malleable properties, as key elements in women's material subordination.
The programme's cultural diversity is reflected in the architecture of individual buildings and over time this has thrown together some strange and slightly dislocated bedfellows -- for example Mario Botta's new San Francisco Museum of Modern Art jostles for attention in a Vitra-like tableau with Fumihiko Maki's low rise performance space and gallery.
Thus, Tsiaras squarely jostles the abstract and figurative back into their traditional roles.
Any force that jostles surface pebbles--the impact of raindrops or the expansion and contraction of clay particles in the soil as they absorb and release moisture, for instance--can make the stones ride up on smaller particles that have recently fallen.