jolt

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jolt someone out of something

to startle someone out of inertness. The cold water thrown in her face was what it took to jolt Mary out of her deep sleep. At the sound of the telephone, he jolted himself out of his stupor.
See also: jolt, of, out

jolt to a start

 and jolt to a stop
to start or stop moving suddenly, causing a jolt. The truck jolted to a stop at the stop sign. The little car jolted to a quick start and threw the passenger back in his seat.
See also: jolt, start

jolt to a stop

See previous.
See also: jolt, stop

jolt

1. n. the degree of potency of the alcohol in liquor. It doesn’t have much of a jolt.
2. n. a drink of strong liquor. He knocked back a jolt and asked for another.
3. n. a portion or dose of a drug. (Drugs.) How about a little jolt as a taste?
4. n. the rush from an injection of drugs. (Drugs.) This stuff doesn’t have much jolt.
References in periodicals archive ?
To summarize job market trends, the experimental JOLTS data were aggregated into three categories--establishments with fewer than 50 employees (representing about 40 percent of private sector employment); establishments with 50 to 249 employees (representing about a third of private sector employment); and establishments with at least 250 employees (representing about a quarter of private sector employment).
Five research papers were presented at the JOLTS Symposium.
There is an inverse relationship between cone jolt toughness and friability.
Products in the Jolt Awards Design and Modeling category must fulfill multiple requirements, including GUI design, modeling, automatic code generation, and prototyping - all are features in the new XML Pipeline Design tools in the Stylus Studio 2007 XML Enterprise Suite product.
A third type of quake attracted attention in 1992 after geologists found a fault running right through Seattle that caused a major jolt 1,100 years ago.
After that jolt, scientists set up networks of seismometers capable of detecting the long-period vibrations of the normal modes.
If Romanowicz is right, the current spell of strike-slip jolts will soon die down, giving way to a renewed period of great thrust quakes.
In the late hours of June 27 and early the next morning, a set of 22 small tremors appeared in precisely the spot that would soon generate the Landers earthquake, the largest jolt to hit California in 40 years.
The small patch of the San Andreas running through this town produced jolts between magnitude 5.
5 or 6 jolts about every 22 years for the last century (though the next one is overdue).
At that same time, similar bursts of perceptible jolts and microquakes started at a dozen other sites in the western United States, including Mt.
So by the reckoning of most experts, Santa Cruz should remain free of any large jolts for quite some time.