joint


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Related to joint: Mechanical Joint

blow this joint

To leave a place, especially one that has become dull or of no use or interest, generally in search of something better. Often preceded by "let's." This is boring, let's blow this joint and find something else to do. I graduate in six months, then it's time to blow this joint.
See also: blow, joint, this

hop joint

A location where opium is dealt and smoked; an opium den. Though they've become pretty rare, you can still find a few hop joints downtown.
See also: hop, joint

nose out of joint

A phrase said of one who is upset, usually due to another's actions or words. Yeah, she's got her nose out of joint, but I don't think I said anything that offensive.
See also: joint, nose, of, out

blow the joint

To leave a place, especially one that has become dull or of no use or interest, generally in search of something better. Often preceded by "let's." This is boring, let's blow the joint and find something else to do. I graduate in six months, then it's time to blow the joint.
See also: blow, joint

case the joint

1. slang To observe a place in order to familiarize oneself with its workings in preparation for some criminal activity (often robbery). Judging from the security footage, those men cased the joint hours before robbing it.
2. slang By extension, to thoroughly examine a place. In this usage, no devious motive is implied. As soon as my kids walking into the hotel room, they started casing the joint, exclaiming about everything from the TV to the mini-fridge.
See also: case, joint

(one's) nose is out of joint

One is upset or annoyed, usually due to another person's actions or words. Yeah, her nose is out of joint, but I don't think I said anything that offensive. The kids' noses are out of joint because I took away their video games for the weekend.
See also: joint, nose, of, out

put (one's) nose out of joint

To upset one, usually through actions or words. Well, something put my mother's nose out of joint—what exactly did you say to her?
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

have (got) (one's) nose out of joint

To be upset, irritated, or dejected, usually by something someone else did or said. Yeah, she's got her nose out of joint, but I don't think I said anything that offensive. The boss has his nose out of joint about something today, so I wouldn't bother him about anything unless it's absolutely necessary.
See also: have, joint, nose, of, out

out of joint

1. Literally, of a bone, dislocated from its socket or joint. It appears from the X-ray that your bone has been put out of joint from the impact.
2. In or into a tumultuous, disordered, unsatisfactory, improper or abnormal way or mode. The characters' lives are thrown out of joint when they are drafted into the military just after graduating from high school. The stock market has remained out of joint ever since the president's decision to pursue a trade war sent shares plummeting to their lowest point in eight years last month.
See also: joint, of, out

clip joint

An establishment, often a restaurant or club, that routinely overcharges or otherwise swindles its patrons. I refuse to go to that club and pay its exorbitant cover charge—it's a real clip joint.
See also: clip, joint

creep joint

1. slang A brothel. Please don't tell me that the media got a picture of the senator leaving some creep joint over the weekend.
2. slang An gambling enterprise that frequently changes locations. That creep joint is always on the move so the police don't catch up to them.
3. slang An establishment, typically a bar or restaurant, that is generally filled with unsavory or degenerate people ("creeps"). Ugh, this bar is such a creep joint—every guy that's hit on me is 60 or older.
See also: creep, joint

square

1. adjective, slang Dull, conventional, or unfashionable; not inclined to do fun, risky, or unconventional things. God, when did I become so square? I used to love going out on a Friday night, but now I'd rather just stay home and read. It's inevitable that your kids are going to think you're square, so it's no use resisting it or trying to change their minds.
2. noun, slang A dull, conventional, or unfashionable person; someone who is not inclined to do fun, risky, or unconventional things. All the kids in this school are squares, you know? Back in my old school, we used to do all sorts of wild things! I know you think I'm a square, but I've got actual responsibilities that I have to deal with.
3. noun A filling and nutritious meal. It was a tough place to live, but at least we always got three squares a day.
4. noun, slang A cigarette. Hey, man, could I bum a square off ya? A key part of being a waiter was always figuring out when to slip outside for a square or two.

get (one's) nose out of joint

To become upset, irritated, or dejected, usually by something someone else did or said. Yeah, she's got her nose out of joint, but I don't think I said anything that offensive. The boss got his nose out of joint about something today, so I wouldn't bother him about anything unless it's absolutely necessary.
See also: get, joint, nose, of, out

blow the joint

Sl. to get out of a place, usually in a hurry or without delay. Come on, let's blow the joint before there's trouble. They blew the joint about an hour ago.
See also: blow, joint

case the joint

 
1. Sl. to look over some place to figure out how to break in, what to steal, etc. (Underworld.) First of all you gotta case the joint to see where things are. You could see he was casing the joint the way he hung around.
2. Sl. to look a place over. The dog came in and cased the joint, sniffing out friends and foes. The old lady entered slowly, casing the joint for someone of her own age, and finally took a seat.
See also: case, joint

get one's nose out of joint and have one's nose out of joint; put one's nose out of joint

Fig. to resent that one has been slighted, neglected, or insulted. You get your nose out of joint too easily about stuff like that. Now, don't get your nose out of joint. She didn't mean it.
See also: and, get, have, joint, nose, of, out, put

put someone's nose out of joint

Fig. to make someone resentful. What's wrong with Jill? What put her nose out of joint? Don't put your nose out of joint. I didn't mean anything by what I said.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

square (meal)

a good and nutritious meal. (Always with quantifier when square is used without meal.) I need three squares a day—at least. The old beggar looks like he could use a square meal.

nose out of joint, have one's

Be upset or irritated, especially when displaced by someone. For example, Ever since Sheila got promoted he's had his nose out of joint. Similarly, put one's nose out of joint indicates the cause of the upset, as in The boss's praise of her assistant put Jean's nose out of joint. The earliest form of this idiom, first recorded in 1581, was thrust one's nose out of joint, with put appearing shortly thereafter. Presumably all these expressions allude to the face-distorting grimace made by one who is displeased.
See also: have, nose, of, out

out of joint

1. Dislocated, as in Trying to break his fall, he put his shoulder out of joint. [Late 1300s]
3. Out of order, inauspicious or unsatisfactory, as in The entire lineup of our team is out of joint. Shakespeare had this term in Hamlet (1:5): "The time is out of joint." [Early 1400s]
See also: joint, of, out

put someone's nose out of joint

If something puts someone's nose out of joint, it offends or upsets them, because they think that they have not been treated with the respect that they deserve. Ian had his nose put out of joint when a colleague who had been with the company for less time than him was promoted and he wasn't. Note: You can also say that someone's nose is out of joint or that someone has their nose out of joint. A few noses in the firm are out of joint since the arrival of a dynamic young manager. Note: You often use this expression to suggest that the person who is offended thinks that they are more important than they really are.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

case the joint

reconnoitre a place before carrying out a robbery. informal
See also: case, joint

out of joint

1 (of a specified joint) out of position; dislocated. 2 in a state of disorder or disorientation.
2 1601 William Shakespeare Hamlet The time is out of joint.
See also: joint, of, out

put someone's nose out of joint

upset or annoy someone. informal
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

case the ˈjoint

(informal) look carefully around a building so that you can plan how to steal things from it at a later time: I saw two men here earlier. Do you think they were casing the joint?
See also: case, joint

out of ˈjoint


1 (of a bone) pushed out of its correct position
2 not working or behaving in the normal way: Time is thrown completely out of joint in the opening chapters of the book.
See also: joint, of, out

put somebody’s ˈnose out of joint

(informal) upset or annoy somebody, especially by not giving them enough attention: The new teacher speaks much better German than he does. That’s going to put his nose out of joint.
If a bone is out of joint, it is pushed out of its correct position.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

blow the joint

tv. to get out of a place, probably in a hurry. (see also joint.) Come on, let’s blow the joint before there’s trouble.
See also: blow, joint

case the joint

1. tv. to look over some place to figure out how to break in, what to steal, etc. (see also joint.) First of all you gotta case the joint to see where things are.
2. tv. to look a place over. (No criminal intent. From sense 1) The dog came in and cased the joint, sniffing out friends and foes.
See also: case, joint

clip joint

n. a business establishment that cheats customers. The clip joint on Fourth Street was busted last night.
See also: clip, joint

creep joint

and creep dive
n. an unpleasant place populated by creeps. You shouldn’t go into a creep joint like that alone. What’s a nice girl like you doing in a creep dive like this?
See also: creep, joint

get one’s nose out of joint

tv. to feel slighted by something someone has done; to take offense at something. (see also put someone’s nose out of joint.) You get your nose out of joint too easily about stuff like that.
See also: get, joint, nose, of, out

heavy joint

n. a marijuana cigarette tipped with phencyclidine (PCP). (Drugs.) He said something about smoking a heavy joint just before he passed out.
See also: heavy, joint

joint

1. n. a tavern; a speakeasy. (Prohibition.) I wanted to open a joint, but I don’t have the cash.
2. n. a low-class establishment; a dive. Let’s get out of this crummy joint.
3. n. a tobacco cigarette. Why are beggars being choosers about their joints all of a sudden?
4. n. a marijuana cigarette. The joint wasn’t enough to carry him very long.
5. n. a penis. (Usually objectionable.) He covered his joint and ran for the dressing room.
6. n. a jail; a prison. (Underworld.) Lefty just got out of the joint.
7. n. a toilet. I gotta get to the joint fast!

juice joint

n. a liquor establishment; a speakeasy. (Prohibition.) His grandfather ran a juice joint during prohibition.
See also: joint, juice

put someone’s nose out of joint

tv. to cause someone to feel slighted; to cause someone to take offense. (see also get one’s nose out of joint.) I’m sorry we didn’t invite you. We didn’t mean to put your nose out of joint.
See also: joint, nose, of, out, put

square

1. mod. old-fashioned; law-abiding; stodgy. Man, you are really square.
2. n. a person who behaves properly. You are a square if I ever saw one.
3. and square joint n. a tobacco cigarette, compared to a marijuana cigarette. I’ll take a reefer. I’ve heard that square joints will give you cancer.
4. tv. to settle or to make something right. Will twenty bucks square the matter?
5. Go to square (meal).

square joint

verb
See square
See also: joint, square

square

verb

out of joint

1. Dislocated, as a bone.
2. Informal
a. Not harmonious; inconsistent.
b. Out of order; inauspicious or unsatisfactory.
c. In bad spirits or humor; out of sorts.
See also: joint, of, out
References in periodicals archive ?
Joints between the ends of bones are what give our bodies flexibility, mobility, strength and suppleness.
An officer's joint-qualification points are calculated by combining joint-education points, joint-experience points (based on the duration and intensity of the officer's joint assignments), and other discretionary points, which are based on training, exercises, and education other than JPME.
Aside from gobbling up too much solder, are fat solder joints in wave soldering more than a cosmetic problem?
When a JUON is submitted to the Joint Staff, the goal is for the Joint Staff to make a recommendation on its disposition within 48 hours, but no longer than 14 days.
Sullivan, Taylor, Barrick, and Stelk are, or have previously been, employed at the College Hill Library in Westminster, Colorado, a joint college-public library that has been open since 1998.
Countertrack CVJ designs are used on the fixed joints of all propshafts, and on the wheel-end CVJ of front sideshafts of FWD, AWD and 4x4 vehicles.
A good definition for joint professionals would be those who are schooled in and practice the unique and expert competencies of joint warfare, and respond to its calling with moral service to the nation.
Marc Holliday, President and Chief Executive Officer of SL Green said, "The sale of 180 Madison will allow SL Green to realize significant gains from the final transaction in our highly successful joint venture with Morgan Stanley Real Estate.
Seal assembly, NSN 5330-01-271-9490, is used on all M939-series trucks with the original Carden-style CV joints.
The partnership agreement required that all hospitals owned by the joint venture operate under Rev.
Reports of pigmented villonodular synovitis in the temporomandibular joint are rare.
You can also damage a joint during a repetitive activity like running if the joint isn't properly aligned, says Millar.
We really call this community use, as opposed to joint use.
Under pre-1977 law, the entire value of joint tenancy property was included in a decedent's gross estate except for the portion of the property attributable to the consideration furnished by the survivor.