jockey for position, to

jockey for position

1. Literally, to move one's horse into a good or ideal position while racing. He's jockeying for position, but I don't think he'll finish higher than third.
2. To compete against others for a desirable role or thing. With the CEO retiring, everyone in management is jockeying for position The more outgoing kids started jockeying for position as soon as the class took the stage.
See also: jockey, position

jockey for position

 
1. Lit. to work one's horse into a desired position in a horse race. Three riders were jockeying for position in the race. Ken was behind, but jockeying for position.
2. . Fig. to work oneself into a desired position. The candidates were jockeying for position, trying to get the best television exposure. I was jockeying for position but running out of campaign money.
See also: jockey, position

jockey for position

Maneuver or manipulate for one's own benefit, as in The singers are always jockeying for position on stage. This expression, dating from about 1900, originally meant maneuvering a race horse into a better position for winning. It was transferred to other kinds of manipulation in the mid-1900s.
See also: jockey, position

jockey for position

If someone jockeys for position, they try to get into a better position or situation than people they are competing against. Reporters with their cameras jockeyed for position. Some presenters are already jockeying for position to see who will read the new Six O'Clock News. Note: Jockeying for position is also used as a noun. There was a constant jockeying for position between the superpowers. Note: The image here is of jockeys (= riders of race horses) trying to get their horses into the best position at the beginning of a race.
See also: jockey, position

jockey for position

manoeuvre in order to gain advantage over rivals in a competitive situation.
See also: jockey, position

jockey for position, to

To maneuver or manipulate, to further one’s own interest. The verb to jockey has meant to gain an advantage through adroit maneuvering from about 1700 or so. To jockey for position was used literally (meaning to maneuver a racehorse) in the early twentieth century and was only transferred to other endeavors about 1950. The London Times had it in 1955, “Lawyers jockeying for position to appear before the right judge.”
See also: jockey