job


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

job

1. n. a drunkard. Give the job a drink and make somebody happy today.
2. n. a theft; a criminal act. (see also pull a job.) Who did that job at the old mansion last week?
See:
References in classic literature ?
What was his astonishment when he just peeped out, by way of caution, to see that the person who had opened it was--not Job Trotter, but a servant-girl with a candle in her hand
Hayden and Traditi present readers with a system for finding a job in any field.
The Disposable American exhaustively explores the social and economic costs of these massive modern job losses.
Here motion picture production is the top job generator with international trade second, Ackerman said.
Once an economy reaches the middle income level of development, service industries become a more important source of job growth than manufacturing.
The big job boards are just too bloated," reports Susan Kane, Director of Sales for SelectLeaders.
On the job opportunity side of the relationship (i.
He landed a job as a truck driver's helper for an appliance company, and, for the first time since he'd left the Infant Mortality Network, he made money without breaking the law.
American trade union leaders have made the issue their cross to bear, portraying it as the ultimate betrayal of the promises made for the overseas flight of manufacturing jobs.
Alternatively, for far less money, camps can advertise open positions online, year-round, through regional job Web sites and reach a more targeted audience
Employers may post links to their companies' Web sites, human resources departments and job search pages.
In the not too distant past, looking for a job in the dental profession was fairly limiting; either you heard about an opening through word-of-mouth or you checked the local newspapers' classified ads.
TO IDENTIFY THEIR STRENGTHS and weaknesses and possibly discover new career affinities, job seekers take aptitude and psychological tests.
Although some communicators are left jobless by a company they've served for years, others are brought on board to help communicate organizational changes, only to be downsized out of a job soon thereafter.