jewel

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crown jewel

1. A precious jewel that is part of or featured on a monarch's or sovereign's regalia. Just one crown jewel from the Queen's regalia is worth enough money to buy a small country.
2. An asset or possession prized as being the best of a group of similar things. This vintage 1965 Corvette Stingray is the crown jewel of my car collection. The works of Shakespeare are the crown jewels of English drama.
See also: crown, jewel

crown jewels

1. The precious jewels, and the regalia or which they are featured, of a monarch or sovereign, as worn or used on a state occasion. One of the greatest mysteries of 20th-century Ireland was the case of the Irish Crown Jewels, which were stolen from Dublin Castle in 1907 and never recovered.
2. slang A man's genitals, especially the testicles. When she heard he had an affair, she kicked him right in the crown jewels.
See also: crown, jewel

family jewels

slang Male genitalia, especially the testicles. An allusion to the testes' role in producing offspring and thus maintaining the family line. When she heard he had an affair, she kicked him right in the family jewels.
See also: family, jewel

the jewel in the crown

An asset or possession prized as being the best of a group of similar things. This vintage 1965 Corvette Stingray is the jewel in the crown of my car collection. The works of Shakespeare are the jewels in the crown of English drama.
See also: crown, jewel

crown jewels

1. A prized possession or asset, as in The Iliad and Odyssey are the crown jewels of ancient literature, or The software products are the company's crown jewels. This usage transfers the value of royal jewels to some other object. [Late 1800s]
2. Also, family jewels. The male genitals, especially the testicles. For example, She gave the would-be mugger a hard kick in the family jewels. A slang euphemism, the term dates from the 1970s, and the variant from the early 1900s.
See also: crown, jewel

the jewel in someone's/something's crown

or

the jewel in the crown of someone/something

COMMON If something or someone is the jewel in someone's or something's crown or the jewel in the crown of someone or something, it is the best thing they have, or their greatest achievement. He has written a number of excellent books but this novel is surely the jewel in his crown. The jewel in the architectural crown of North Yorkshire is almost certainly Castle Howard. Note: This expression was known in Victorian times, but is probably most well known as the title of a novel by Paul Scott, published in 1966, that formed part of a series set in the Raj, or Victorian India. In this title, India is seen as the `jewel', and the `crown' is the British Empire.
See also: crown, jewel

the (or your) family jewels

a man's genitals. informal
See also: family, jewel

the jewel in the (or someone's) crown

the most attractive or successful part of something.
In the early 20th century, this was used as a term for the British imperial colonies as a whole. The Jewel in the Crown was subsequently used by Paul Scott as the title of the first novel of his Raj Quartet, which is set in the last days of British rule in India.
See also: crown, jewel

the jewel in the ˈcrown

the most attractive or valuable part of something: The research facility is considered the jewel in the crown of the nation’s technology industry.
See also: crown, jewel

family jewels

n. the testicles. (Jocular and euphemistic. They are necessary to produce a family.) Hey, careful of the family jewels!
See also: family, jewel
References in classic literature ?
Among other offerings, we were permitted to handle the jewelled belt presented to the pugilist by the State of Nevada, a gold brick from the citizens of Sacramento, and a model of himself in solid silver from the Fisticuff Club in New York.
In another moment he had taken out the jewelled belt presented to Maguire by the State of Nevada, the solid silver statuette of himself, and the gold brick from the citizens of Sacramento.
I had flown; so had the gold brick, the jewelled belt, and the silver statuette.
Raffles wished him good-morning, as well he might; for he had been upstairs to wash his face and hands; and in the prize-fighter's great hat and fur coat he might have marched round Scotland Yard itself, in spite of his having the gold brick from Sacramento in one pocket, the silver statuette of Maguire in the other, and round his waist the jewelled belt presented to that worthy by the State of Nevada.
Any trifle will serve--a purse of gold, or even a jewelled goblet.
For profit- -his life blood transmuted into a wine-supper, or a jewelled gewgaw, or some similar sense-orgy of the parasitic and idle rich, his masters, the arch-beasts.
The sky over them was like a jewelled cup from which the dusk was pouring; the air was crisp with the compelling tang of the sea, and the whole landscape was infused with the subtleties of a sea evening.
The whole of the rest of the garden was on fire with tulips; behind me, on the other side of the wall, were rows and rows of them,--cups of translucent loveliness, a jewelled ring flung right round the lawn.
Beautiful combs, pure tortoise shell, with jewelled rims--just the shade to wear in the beautiful vanished hair.
The top one I had drawn over her face to shelter it from the night, so I could see nothing but the vague shape of her, and her light-brown hair, escaped from the covering and jewelled with moisture from the air.
They thronged the narrow length of our schooner's decks with their ornamented and barbarous crowd, with the variegated colours of checkered sarongs, red turbans, white jackets, embroideries; with the gleam of scabbards, gold rings, charms, armlets, lance blades, and jewelled handles of their weapons.