jest

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Related to jests: take a joke

in jest

For fun; as a joke; without sincerity. I know your remarks were only in jest, but they still hurt my feelings.
See also: jest

it's ill jesting with edged tools

proverb Casually engaging with dangerous people or things is likely to cause harm. You're right, I don't speed when I'm driving in the rain, not even a little bit. That's because my mom taught me that it's ill jesting with edged tools. You're picking fights with known gang members, Tom. I know you're a tough guy and all, but it's ill jesting with edged tools.
See also: edge, ill, jest, tool

jest about (someone or something)

To make joking, witty, or amusing remarks about or at the expense of someone or something. If people could only hear the way those snobbish politicians jested about the economic crisis at the gala event. There would be a revolution, I tell you! Several employees were jesting about the new manager in the break room.
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jest at (someone or something)

To make mocking, teasing, or jeering remarks about or at the expense of someone or something. Everyone had been jesting at the dire future of the company, never expecting it to actually go under. The members of the royal court jested at the prisoner as he pleaded for his life before the king.
See also: jest

jest with (one)

1. To tease or make fun of one in a playful manner. The kitchen was filled with the raucous sound of everyone jesting with one another over dinner. Jesting with my friends has always been my way of showing them affection.
2. To attempt to fool one in a mocking or condescending manner. Often used as a rhetorical question or statement by the person at the receiving end. A: "I'm afraid we will need another $10,000 to finish the project." B: "Are you jesting with me? What on earth happened to all the money we've already invested?" They must be jesting with us. Who do they think they're dealing with?
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many a true word is spoken in jest

proverb The things that one jokes about may in fact be true or become true. I know she said she was joking about being depressed, but I'm concerned—many a true word is spoken in jest. A: "Oh come one, I was only joking! I would never do something like that!" B: "So you say, but many a true word is spoken in jest."
See also: jest, many, spoken, true, word

there's many a true word spoken in jest

The things that one jokes about may in fact be true or become true. I know she said she was joking about being depressed, but I'm concerned—there's many a true word spoken in jest.
See also: jest, many, spoken, true, word
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

jest about someone or something

to make jokes about someone or something. There is no need to jest about Lady Bracknell. I wish you would not jest about that.
See also: jest

jest at someone or something

to make fun of someone or something. Please don't jest at my cousin. Is someone jesting at my hairdo?
See also: jest

jest with someone

to joke with someone; to try to fool someone. Surely you are jesting with me. Don't jest with me!
See also: jest

Many a true word is spoken in jest.

 and There's many a true word spoken in jest.
Prov. Just because something is said as a joke, it can still be true. Fred: Why did you make a joke about my being stingy? Do you really think I'm cheap? Ellen: Of course not, don't be silly. It was just a joke. Fred: But many a true word is spoken in jest.
See also: jest, many, spoken, true, word
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in ˈjest

as a joke: The remark was made half in jest.‘Many a true word is spoken in jest,’ thought Rosie (= people often say things as a joke that are actually true).
See also: jest
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in classic literature ?
"See, Harvey," said Dan, rapping with his fork on the table, "it's jest as I said.
Aptitude tests for the appointment of JESTs and ECTs were conducted between November 11 and 28 last year.
With just a small percentage of candidates meeting the cut-off, appointments on only 32% of the vacant post for JESTs could have been made.
"He receives comfort like cold porridge," the king's brother, Sebastian, jests, capitalizing on the homonym peace/peas (2.1.10).
Not only do Antonio and Sebastian, through their jests, violate a courtier's modesty and gravity; they also, through their jokes, show no respect for the grieving condition of their ruler.
Brown avoids psychoanalytic or Foucauldian theory as means of interpreting jests, instead emphasizing their radical, destabilizing potential.
Brown considers the representation of women within jesting literature as well as women's "unwritten" roles as joke tellers and audience members, and she challenges the assumptions that early modern humor always presented women as the "humiliated butts of jokes" or the "passive auditors of men's jests" (2).
This attention to neighborhood theatre is continued in the third chapter, which explores the many jests and jigs associated with early modern cuckoldry.
Dekker's intent, among others, is to unpack or translate a set of seventeenth-century jests for a twenty-first century audience as a window into an emergent Dutch bourgeois culture.
The author impressively analyzes how courtiers preserved or inverted social hierarchy in their jests, or accomplished both at once.
The first extant edition of The Jests of Scoggin dates from 1626; but it was entered in the Stationers' Register around 1556.
The jests and practical jokes are broadly farcical, often brutal, sometimes obscene; but they have a serious theme.
A noted London alewife of the late Elizabethan period, nominal source of many jests and anecdotes, and often mentioned in Elizabethan drama.
Jests that alluded to the drama of sexuality, voyeurism, commerce, and violence were prominent in all the places where women came together.