jar

(redirected from jarringly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to jarringly: coming along
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

catch (one) with (one's) hand in the cookie jar

To catch one in the act or attempt of some wrongdoing, especially involving bribery or the illicit exploitation of one's position of power or authority. Likened to a child literally being caught trying to steal cookies. The authorities haven been trying to catch that senator with his hand in the cookie jar for years—he's long been accused of insider trading.
See also: catch, cookie, hand, jar

caught with (one's) hand in the cookie jar

To have been caught in the act or attempt of some wrongdoing, especially one involving bribery or the illicit exploitation of one's position of power or authority. The senator was long accused of insider trading, and he was finally caught with his hand in the cookie jar when his conversation with a Wall Street executive was leaked to the media.
See also: caught, cookie, hand, jar

have (one's) hand in the cookie jar

To be in the act or attempt of some wrongdoing, especially one involving bribery or the illicit exploitation of one's position of power or authority. The senator was long accused of having his hand in the cookie jar, and he was finally caught when his conversation with a Wall Street executive about insider trading was leaked to the media. The new tax legislation is an attempt to close the loopholes that have allowed companies that had their hands in the cookie jar to go unpunished for so many years.
See also: cookie, hand, have, jar

jam jar

slang A car. The phrase comes from rhyming slang in which "jam jar" rhymes with "car." Primarily heard in UK. That's a beauty of a jam jar you've got there. What is it, a '67? My jam jar won't start today—can I get a ride with you?
See also: jam, jar

jar against (someone or something)

1. To bump, knock, or slam against something. The group of protesters jarred against the barricades. The butt of the gun jarred against my shoulder as it recoiled.
2. To clash or conflict with something. The upbeat music jarred against the somber atmosphere of the funeral. The country's actions are jarring against the promises made by its prime minister.
3. To create an unpleasant, conflicting, or discordant impression with someone. The book is supposed to be set in an ancient time of high fantasy, so I think the characters' use of modern slang and colloquialisms is going to jar against many readers. Something about what Sarah said was jarring against me, but I couldn't put my finger on it.
See also: jar

jar on (one)

1. To shake, rattle, or vibrate something violently. Some force began jarring on the safety harnesses, and I feared that they could give out entirely. The bumpy carriage ride jarred on my backside.
2. To cause an unpleasant or painful sensation for a part of one's body. The cacophony created by the dozens of birds flying overhead really jarred on our ears. Having so many clashing colors is really going to jar on your audience's eyes. Traveling between so many different time zones that frequently must be very jarring on your body.
3. To create an unpleasant, conflicting, or discordant impression with one. The book is supposed to be set in an ancient time of high fantasy, so I think the characters' use of modern slang and colloquialisms is going to jar on many readers. Something about what Sarah said was jarring on me, but I couldn't put my finger on it.
See also: jar, on

jarhead

slang A member of the United States Marine Corps. Primarily heard in US. The bar was filled with zoomies and jarheads off duty for the long weekend. My father was a jarhead, as was his father, and his father before him, so it was in my blood to become one as well.

jarring experience

An experience that creates an acute sense of shock, confusion, or bewilderment. That car accident was such a jarring experience, I don't know if I'll be able to sleep for days. You need better use of transitional sentences in your paper. Jumping from point to point like that will be a jarring experience for the reader.
See also: experience, jar

on the jar

Partially open, as of a door; ajar. Leave that door on the jar, will you? I love the scent of an early spring morning! He never would have overheard our conversation if you hadn't left the door on the jar!
See also: jar, on

with (one's) hand in the cookie jar

In the act or attempt of some wrongdoing, especially one involving bribery or the illicit exploitation of one's position of power or authority. The senator was long accused of insider trading, and he was finally caught with his hand in the cookie jar when his conversation with a Wall Street executive was leaked to the media. The new tax legislation is an attempt to close the loopholes that have allowed companies with their hands in the cookie jar to go unpunished for so many years.
See also: cookie, hand, jar

jar against someone or something

to bump against someone or something. The guest jarred against the wall, knocking a picture askew. Someone jarred against Fran, almost knocking her over.
See also: jar

jar on someone or something

to bother someone or some-one's nerves. (Similar to jangle on something.) Her voice really jars on me. My brash manner jars on her, I guess.
See also: jar, on

hand in the till, with one's

Also, with one's fingers in the till; have one's hand in the cookie jar. Stealing from one's employer. For example, He was caught with his hand in the till and was fired immediately, or They suspected she had her hand in the cookie jar but were waiting for more evidence. The noun till has been used for a money box or drawer since the 15th century; cookie jar, perhaps alluding to the "sweets" of money, dates only from about 1940.
See also: hand

catch someone with their hand in the cookie jar

AMERICAN
If you catch someone with their hand in the cookie jar, you find them doing something wrong, especially stealing. The banker was caught with his hand in the cookie jar. So Harry caught you with your hand in the cookie jar? What happened next? Note: You can also talk about a person with their hand in the cookie jar or say that they have their hand in the cookie jar. Among those with their hand in the cookie jar was, it is alleged, the director of the program. Note: The usual British expression is have your hand in the till.
See also: catch, cookie, hand, jar, someone

with your hand in the cookie jar

engaged in surreptitious theft from your employer. North American informal
See also: cookie, hand, jar

jarhead

n. a U.S. Marine. (Attributed to the shape of a cap and to the haircut.) Do you want to spend a few years as a gravel-pounder or a jarhead? You get free clothes with both jobs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The language of these poems often recapitulates the mind/body problem as it moves, sometimes jarringly, from the metaphysical ("it's never what / we think ourselves with thinking into") to the just-plain-physical ("Five year post-chemo, a knife stabbed through / my thigh.
But if The Business of Benevolence is mostly a summary of familiar information, it is at times a jarringly revisionist retelling of the story of welfare capitalism.
Occasionally, phrases are used that are jarringly out of character with the otherwise serious treatment of the subject, as, for example, "...
His rhymes are jarringly off or disconcertingly exact, and his ragged stanzas vary from lines of one word to lines that meander the length of a paragraph, often interrupted by inapposite digressions.
Mr Lerer has the structure of his book well under control, each chapter ending with an adequate and appropriate link to the next, and I therefore find the five or so pages of summary of contents of the chapters at the conclusion of the Introduction jarringly unnecessary in what is otherwise a tightly written monograph and one which shows such excellent control of critical vocabulary and secondary material.
It doesn't help that the musical's tone veers so jarringly from somber tragedy to silly camp.
15 THIS jarringly disingenuous documentary tries to suggest the phenomenon of sleep paralysis is evidence of the paranormal.
The story is set almost seamlessly in our world; however, because of its original format as a webcomic, some of the attempts to ground it in reality are jarringly a few years out of date.
A boring blizzard of dreary community dance troupes and jarringly old-fashioned singers from a bygone era.
Juxtaposed with what seem to be exercises in dispassion, the images displayed on the third pair of devices felt jarringly optimistic, like a corrective of sorts, reassuring the viewer that what might be read as the artist's aestheticization of real-world horror was tempered by genuine empathy.
If Blake can manage to tone down some of the jarringly anachronistic dialog that mars the text, he may have a fabulous series on his hands.--Mark Flowers.
With a title that automatically evokes Franz Kafka's unfinished first novel, Amerika provides a jarringly absurd version of the traditional immigrant narrative.
Film Socialisme, Godard's latest, features staccato-paced montages of short scenes and vivid images supplemented, at times, by cryptic three-word subtitles written in what Godard coined "Navajo English." Though challenging to followI saw two people walk out of the theater halfway throughthe film is undeniably beautiful, if at times jarringly abrupt to take in.
Working from a witty script he co-wrote with Sandvig, Crano manages the difficult feat of keeping his comedy on an even keel, even during moments that are jarringly serious or genuinely discomfiting.
Gandalf Murphy and the Slambovian Circus of Dreams, sometimes called "The Hillbilly Pink Floyd," is, at its core, a jarringly fresh indie rock band with a clear, engaging sound.