jailhouse lawyer


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jailhouse lawyer

A non-attorney who dispenses legal advice. Properly speaking, a jailhouse lawyer is a prison inmate who, although not a law school graduate (much less a member of the bar), has the requisite skill to assist other prisoners with such legal matters as preparing and filing appeals, writs, and pardon requests. Much of such knowledge came from personal experience. The phrase also applies to any layman, behind bars or not, who offers legal advice, solicited or not.
See also: lawyer
References in periodicals archive ?
131) The Avery Court rested this determination on the fact that many inmates are illiterate or uneducated, and the jailhouse lawyer can assist those inmates achieve their broader constitutional right to access to the courts.
Most newsrooms have a person on staff who is the jailhouse lawyer on libel, open meetings, access to records.
Howell has taken on the role as selfappointed jailhouse lawyer on top of his other duties as an orderly in the prison wing of the jail's hospital.
Imprisoned journalist and activist Mumia Abu-Jamal profiles the work of the jailhouse lawyer in the United States, offering a perspective of the law written from the bottom, in recognition that beyond the black and white of the law books and the statutes, "the law ain't nothing but whatta judge say the law is.
See Note, Constitutional Law: Prison "No-Assistance" Regulations and the Jailhouse Lawyer, 1968 DUKE L.
Bosses at Glenochil prison told the jailhouse lawyer that his papers, amassed during constant legal fights with the authorities, were a fire risk.
Beggs - who was jailed for the murder of teenager Barry Wallace - has gained a reputation as a jailhouse lawyer by advising his fellow cons at Peterhead.
Beggs has been revelling in his role as jailhouse lawyer to some of the worst killers, rapists and paedophiles in our prisons.
Beggs, who fancies himself as a jailhouse lawyer, dumped the limbs and torso in Loch Lomond and the head in the sea at Troon.
Jailhouse lawyer Beggs had complained about the media coverage of his trial, the conduct of the prosecutor and an abuse of his human rights.
Then he became a jailhouse lawyer dishing out advice to fellow cons on their appeals.
Beggs, 45, who fancies himself as a jailhouse lawyer, has advised numerous prisoners since being sentenced to life in 2001.
The Record revealed in September that the murdering pervert, who fancies himself as a jailhouse lawyer, was helping his fellow cons make their claims and charging them pounds 300 a time "commission".
While some jailhouse lawyers, with restricted access to law libraries, depend on P.