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big jab

slang A lethal injection of drugs, as administered to someone who has been sentenced to death. After the horrific crimes that guy's committed, he needs to get the big jab.
See also: big, jab

have a jab at (someone or something)

To make a teasing, sarcastic, or insulting remark, gibe, or criticism at someone's or something's expense. I'm really not trying to have a jab at you. I'm just trying to give you some constructive feedback. He's really nice to me when we hang out by ourselves, but he always starts having jabs at me when we're around his other friends. I can speak the language very well, but they still can't resist having a jab at my accent.
See also: have, jab

jab (someone or something) with (something)

To poke or stab someone or something with some long, sharp, or pointed object. The teacher jabbed the sleeping student with her finger. Don't just jab your patient with the needle like that! The kids jabbed the beehive with a long stick.
See also: jab

jab (something) into (something else)

To poke, stab, or thrust something into something else. Don't just jab the USB drive into the computer—you might break it! I can't believe the doctor just jabbed the needle into my arm like that!
See also: jab

jab (something) out at (someone or something)

To stab or thrust something outward in the direction of someone or something. The teacher jabbed her finger out at the disruptive student. The mantis shrimp is able to jab its claws out at prey at incredible speeds.
See also: jab, out

jab at (someone or something)

1. verb To poke, punch, stab, or thrust at someone or something very quickly or abruptly. I couldn't believe the way the doctor was jabbing at my arm with that needle! Where did she go to med school? The boxer jabbed at his opponent and landed a hit right on his chin.
2. noun A teasing, sarcastic, or insulting remark, gibe, or criticism at someone's or something's expense. I'm really not having a jab at you. I'm just trying to give you some constructive feedback. He's really nice to me when we hang out by ourselves, but he always starts making little jabs at me when we're around his other friends. I can speak the language very well, but they still can't resist taking a jab at my accent.
See also: jab

jab in

1. To poke, stab, or thrust something into something else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "jab" and "in." Don't just jab in the USB drive—you might break it! I can't believe the doctor just jabbed the needle in my arm like that!
2. To poke, punch, or stab someone in a particular part of their body. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is always used between "jab" and "in." She jabbed the criminal in the arm with a steak knife. The boxer jabbed his opponent in the gut.
See also: jab

jab out

To stab or thrust something outward in the direction of someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "jab" and "out." The teacher jabbed her finger out at the disruptive student. The mantis shrimp is able to jab out its claws at incredible speeds.
See also: jab, out

jabpop

obsolete slang An injection of some drug, especially a narcotic. It's easy to recruit a junkie who'll do anything to get another jabpop.

take a jab at (someone or something)

To make a mocking, sarcastic, insulting remark or criticism at someone's or something's expense. The senator continued taking jabs at his opponent's record throughout the debate. I'm really not trying to take a jab at you. I'm just trying to give you some constructive feedback. I can speak the language very well, but they still can't resist taking a jab at my accent.
See also: jab, take

jab at someone or something

to poke or punch at someone or something. Tom jabbed at Fred. Don't jab at the cat!
See also: jab

jab someone in something

to poke someone in a particular location on the body. Fred jabbed Tom in the side. He jabbed himself in the hand.
See also: jab

jab someone with something

to poke or stick someone with something. He jabbed Henry with the rake handle on purpose. The mugger jabbed the victim with a knife.
See also: jab

jab something at someone or something

to poke someone or something with something. Tom jabbed the stick at the dog. I jabbed my fist at Walter.
See also: jab

jab something into something

 and jab something in
to stab something into something. Billy jabbed his spoon into the gelatin. He jabbed in his spoon. He jabbed it in.
See also: jab

jab something out

to thrust something out. Molly jabbed her fist out suddenly. She jabbed out her fist.
See also: jab, out

take a dig at someone

 and take a jab at someone; take digs at someone
Fig. to insult or pester someone. Why did you take a jab at Sam? You're always taking digs at people who think they're your friends. Jane is always taking digs at Bob, but she never really means any harm.
See also: dig, take

take a jab at someone

 and take a punch at someone 
1. to hit at someone; to poke someone. Max took a jab at Lefty and missed. Lefty took a punch at Max.
2. Go to take a dig at someone.
See also: jab, take

big jab

n. a lethal injection used to carry out a death sentence. (Journalistic.) Nearly 59 prisoners got the big jab in Texas this year.
See also: big, jab

jab pop

(ˈdʒæbˈpɑp)
in. to inject (drugs). (Drugs.) Jab popping is a ticket to cement city.
See also: jab, pop

take a dig at someone

and take a jab at someone
tv. to insult or needle someone. You’re always taking digs at people who think they’re your friends. Jed took a jab at Tom about the way he was driving.
See also: dig, someone, take

take a jab at someone

verb
See also: jab, someone, take