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maroon (one) on an island

To cause one to become stranded or stuck on an island. The captain will maroon us on an island if he insists on sailing in these dreadful conditions.
See also: island, maroon, on

no man is an island(, entire of itself)

A person requires the company and support of others and society as a whole in order to thrive. The line is from John Donne's Devotions upon Emergent Occasions, published in 1624. Look, I know you're very proud man, but you need to let other people help you if you're in trouble. No man is an island, Dan. It's when our communities rally around us in times of tragedy that we truly appreciate that no man is an island, entire of itself.
See also: man, no, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

maroon someone on an island

to strand someone on something; to abandon someone on something, such as an island. The pirate captain marooned his first mate on a small island in the Caribbean. Through a navigation error, I marooned myself on a tiny island east of Guam.
See also: island, maroon, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

no man is an island

Human beings necessarily depend on one another, as in You can't manage this all by yourself; no man is an island. This expression is a quotation from John Donne's Devotions (1624): "No man is an Island, entire of it self; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main."
See also: island, man, no
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
In this he sent a cargo of sandal-wood to Canton, having discovered that the foreign merchants trading with him made large profits on this wood, shipped by them from the islands to the Chinese markets.
Astor With Respect to the Sandwich Islands- Karakakooa.- Royal Monopoly of Pork.- Description of the Islanders-Gayeties on Shore.- Chronicler of the Island. -Place Where Captain Cook was Killed.- John Young, a Nautical Governor.- His Story.- Waititi - A Royal Residence.- A Royal Visit - Grand Ceremonials.- Close Dealing- A Royal Pork Merchant- Grievances of a Matter-of-Fact Man.
On the 10th of February, 1828, the Astrolabe appeared off Tikopia, and took as guide and interpreter a deserter found on the island; made his way to Vanikoro, sighted it on the 12th inst., lay among the reefs until the 14th, and not until the 20th did he cast anchor within the barrier in the harbour of Vanou.
On the 23rd, several officers went round the island and brought back some unimportant trifles.
They made signs for me to come down from the rock, and go towards the shore, which I accordingly did; and the flying island being raised to a convenient height, the verge directly over me, a chain was let down from the lowest gallery, with a seat fastened to the bottom, to which I fixed myself, and was drawn up by pulleys.
We had perceived the loom of the mountains about sunset; so that after running all night with a very light breeze, we found ourselves close in with the island the next morning, but as the bay we sought lay on its farther side, we were obliged to sail some distance along the shore, catching, as we proceeded, short glimpses of blooming valleys, deep glens, waterfalls, and waving groves hidden here and there by projecting and rocky headlands, every moment opening to the view some new and startling scene of beauty.
At that time I was ignorant of the fact that by the operation of the 'taboo' the use of canoes in all parts of the island is rigorously prohibited to the entire sex, for whom it is death even to be seen entering one when hauled on shore; consequently, whenever a Marquesan lady voyages by water, she puts in requisition the paddles of her own fair body.
One day, however, as he was lying half asleep in the warm water somewhere off the Island of Juan Fernandez, he felt faint and lazy all over, just as human people do when the spring is in their legs, and he remembered the good firm beaches of Novastoshnah seven thousand miles away, the games his companions played, the smell of the seaweed, the seal roar, and the fighting.
The men were no less than Kerick Booterin, the chief of the seal-hunters on the island, and Patalamon, his son.
It is a curious fact, that the horses have neve left the eastern end of the island, although there is no natural boundary to prevent them from roaming, and that par of the island is not more tempting than the rest.
In colour they differ much; and it is a remarkable circumstance, that in different parts of this on small island, different colours predominate.
These preparations were concluded about five o'clock in the evening, while sentinels kept close watch around the island, and the boats of the Resolute patrolled the channel.
that on the south side, which had hurried me away, and that on the north, which lay about a league on the other side; I say, between these two, in the wake of the island, I found the water at least still, and running no way; and having still a breeze of wind fair for me, I kept on steering directly for the island, though not making such fresh way as I did before.
"A fine fomuly--no finer on the island. No better lods ever sailed out of Island McGill.
Another night when we was up at the head of the island, just before daylight, here comes a frame-house down, on the west side.