be (one's) place (to do something)

(redirected from is one's place)

be (one's) place (to do something)

To be something that one has the authority to do. Often used in the negative to mean the opposite. I know you're just trying to help, mom, but it's not your place to discipline my kids. As much as I want to tell my neighbors what to do with their Christmas decorations, I know it's not my place to.
See also: place

(not) be somebody’s ˈplace to do something

not have the right to do something, for example to criticize somebody, suggest something, etc: ‘Why didn’t you tell him?’ ‘It wasn’t my place to.’He told his secretary that it wasn’t her place to question what he said.
See also: place, something