invest in


Also found in: Legal.

invest something in someone or something

 
1. to put money, time, effort, etc., into someone or something, hoping for a return. We will invest time and effort in Fred and make him into a recording star. Sharon invested a lot of money in the stock market.
2. to place power or authority under control of someone or something. The constitution has invested certain powers in the federal government and left the rest to the states. The law invests the power to arrest criminals in the sheriffs department.
See also: invest

invest in someone or something

to put resources into someone or something in hopes of increasing the value of the person or thing. (The emphasis is on the act of investing.) We invested in Tom, and we have every right to expect a lot from him. She invested in junk bonds heavily.
See also: invest

invest in

v.
1. To commit money or capital to something in order to gain a financial return: We lost a lot of the money we had invested in the stock market last year. We invested $1,000 in stocks.
2. To spend money or time on something that will be beneficial in the future: Since winter is coming up, you might want to invest in a good coat.
3. To commit oneself to some purpose. Used reflexively: The teachers invested themselves in improving the school's curriculum.
See also: invest
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile a pounds 50,000 cash boost from Merseyside Special Investment Fund has enabled the company to invest ins tate of -the-art computer equipment and specialist CAD software.