invent


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

didn't invent gunpowder

Didn't do anything significant. I don't understand why he's so conceited—he didn't invent gunpowder or anything!
See also: invent

if God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent Him

A sentiment expressed by 18th-century French philosopher Voltaire that emphasizes the human need to believe in a divine being. People can't help it—they need something bigger than themselves to believe in, so if God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent Him.
See also: did, god, if, invent, necessary, not

not-invented-here syndrome

A prejudicial belief that products, systems, software, etc., that were not developed within a company or organization are not as suitable or well made as those that are created in-house. I think the boss's not-invented-here-syndrome stems from experiences he had using third-party software in his previous business, which apparently cost them thousands of dollars trying to implement.
See also: syndrome

reinvent the wheel

To do something in a wholly and drastically new way, often unnecessarily. (Usually used in negative constructions.) The film doesn't reinvent the wheel for action films, but it adds enough clever twists on the genre to still feel fresh and new. The company is often criticized for trying to reinvent the wheel every time they bring a new product to market, adding gimmicks and innovations nobody wanted or asked for.
See also: reinvent, wheel

didn't invent gunpowder

Rur. did not do anything terribly important. He may be the class president, but he didn't invent gunpowder. What's all this fuss about a movie star? She didn't invent gunpowder!
See also: invent

If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent Him.

Prov. People need a deity to worship. (This is an English translation of a quote from Voltaire. It is often parodied, using a person's name instead of God and implying that the person is somehow necessary.) The atheist tried to convince Jerry that God does not exist, and that people should not waste their time worshiping Him. "But you can't stop people from worshiping God," Jerry replied. "If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent Him." The unscrupulous mayor was such a convenient scapegoat for the city's problems that if she had not existed, it would have been necessary to invent her.
See also: did, god, if, invent, necessary, not

reinvent the wheel

Fig. to make unnecessary or redundant preparations. You don't need to reinvent the wheel. Read up on what others have done. I don't have to reinvent the wheel, but I will be cautious before I act.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

Do something again, from the beginning, especially in a needless or inefficient effort, as in School committees need not reinvent the wheel every time they try to improve the curriculum. This expression alludes to the invention of a simple but very important device that requires no improvement. [Second half of 1900s]
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

If someone reinvents the wheel, they develop an idea or project that they consider new or different, when it is really no better than something that already exists. To avoid reinventing the wheel, it is important that managers are familiar with established research findings in this area. The problem is that they tend to reinvent the wheel each time they are called upon to respond to a new refugee emergency.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

waste a great deal of time or effort in creating something that already exists or doing something that has already been done.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the ˈwheel

waste time creating something that already exists and works well: There’s no point in us reinventing the wheel. Why can’t we just leave things as they are?
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

tv. to make unnecessary or redundant preparations. You don’t need to reinvent the wheel. Read up on what others have done.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

To do or make something again, from the beginning, especially in a needless or inefficient effort.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel, to

To belabor the obvious; to start again from the beginning when there is no need to. This Americanism dates from the second half of the twentieth century and most likely originated in business or industry. “‘The new compiler here is no different from the old one,’ said a Defense Department spokesman. ‘Let’s not reinvent the wheel’” (Boston Herald, 1984).
See also: reinvent
References in periodicals archive ?
Process capabilities of the base PulseForge Invent configuration include the sintering of conductive silver and copper inks on PET, polyimide, paper, or textiles; drying of functional and graphic inks; reduction of graphene oxide and copper oxide; soldering of standard RoHS lead-free solder paste on low-temperature polymers; crystallization of perovskite or OPV materials; sintering of CIGS and CdTe nanocrystal depositions; and drying and sintering of plastic coatings.
For instance, a lightweight canister vacuum for cleaning house as well as the first user-friendly computer software were both invented by women.
Slaves were not allowed to secure patents for their inventions until 1831, when Thomas Jennings of New York invented a dry-scouring process similar to dry cleaning.
Camel-hair brushes are so called because a Mr Camel invented them.
"We're the ones who conduct research and invent the tools that game designers use to make games more realistic," says Powell, 59, who is also a research professor at the USC School of Engineering, as well as senior fellow at USC's Annenberg School for Communication and its 3-D Center on Public Diplomacy.
It is written in simple language and covers some black scientists and inventors (not all), including Lewis Latimer (born in Chelsea, USA) who, in 1881, invented an electric incandescent light bulb using a carbon filament.
DON'T INVENT PHONY STORIES FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES TO GAIN FAME AND ACCEPTANCE.
It identified several factors to support its conclusion, including (1) the employee was not "hired to invent"; (2) the employee received the royalty payments separate from his salary; (3) the employee and employer executed written agreements to assign the patent rights and to agree on the royalties; (4) royalty payments would continue beyond the employment relationship for the patent's life; (5) the royalty payments were connected to the transfer of the rights to the invention, rather than compensation for services; and (6) the payments received by the employee depended on the use or value of the licensing of the patent, which varied substantially each year.
Attending a convention in Berlin, the 82-year old mechanical designer told reporters, "I would have preferred to invent something which helps people and makes life easier for farmers.
When one considers the variety of ring styles and practices during this period, it becomes clear that jewelry manufacturers and retailers, from an early date, sought to invent traditions that would create new uses for their product.
IF YOU COULD INVENT SOMETHING TO MAKE YOUR JOB EASIER, WHAT WOULD IT BE?
1) Is there a developmental difference in the type of story (i.e., personal narrative, fantasy, realistic fiction) children tell when they are asked to invent a fairy tale?
The publisher's answer to this problem is to invent a new architectural movement or -ism for each volume and then require the poor author to write a l0-page introduction making a case for its legitimacy.