in(to) the swim (of things)

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in(to) the swim (of things)

Actively involved in and knowledgeable about something. It took me a few months to adjust to my new job, but now I'm really into the swim of things. I want to be in the swim when I come back from leave, so I get updates from my team every week.
See also: swim
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*in the swim of things

Fig. involved in or participating in events or happenings. (*Typically: be ~; get [into]~.) I've been ill, but soon I'll be back in the swim of things. I can't wait to settle down and get into the swim of things.
See also: of, swim, thing
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in the swim

Actively participating, in the thick of things, as in He was new in town, but he soon got in the swim at school. This expression alludes to the fishing term for a large number of fish in one area, a so-called swim. [Mid-1800s]
See also: swim
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in the swim

involved in or aware of current affairs or events.
See also: swim
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in(to) the ˈswim (of things)

(informal) involved in things that are happening in society or in a particular situation: After being away for two years, it took her a while to get back into the swim of things.
See also: swim
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in the swim

Active in the general current of affairs.
See also: swim
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in the swim

Actively engaged, in the thick of things. This term comes from fishing, where a large number of fish in one location was sometimes called “a swim.” This term was transferred to mean the main current of affairs. It dates from the mid-nineteenth century. “He knew I was in the swim down here,” wrote Arthur Conan Doyle (The Stock-broker’s Clerk, 1893).
See also: swim
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
About one hour into the swim, Macarine could vaguely make out his destination on the horizon, when he lifted his head to breathe, due to strong waves and gusty winds.