in(to) circulation

(redirected from into circulation)

in(to) circulation

1. Engaging in social activities, typically after an absence. Now that my exams are done, I'm excited to get back in circulation and see my friends again. Jill wants to get into circulation after her hospital stay.
2. Dating again after the end of a relationship. I hope to spend some time with Matt now that he's single again and in circulation. She has mourned her husband and is ready to get back into circulation.
See also: circulation

in circulation

Also, into circulation. In business or social life, especially after a period of absence. For example, After a month in the hospital Bill was eager to get back in circulation. The antonym is out of circulation, as in Since we had twins we've been out of circulation, but we're hoping to get out more often soon . These expressions, dating from the first half of the 1900s, employ circulation in the sense of "making the rounds among people," a usage dating from the 1600s.
See also: circulation
References in periodicals archive ?
For those denominations, the Federal Reserve began paying into circulation only the Series-1990 notes as soon as the Bureau of Engraving and Printing had shipped a sufficient inventory of them to each of the Federal Reserve banks and branches (which was in August 1991 for $100 notes and in February 1992 for $50 notes).
Series-1990 notes of the $20 and $10 denominations were first paid into circulation by Reserve Banks in October 1992 and November 1992 respectively.
Coins are placed into circulation in a process in which the Department of Treasury (1) mints new coins in accord with the needs of the public (using appropriated budget funds for all but the metal cost), (2) books a"profit" (called seigniorage) equal to the difference between the face value of the coins and their cost of production, which is treated as a means of financing the federal budget, and (3) deposits the coins with the Federal Reserve Banks for credit to the Treasury Department's checking account.
The mechanism by which notes are placed into circulation is rather different: (1) The cost of new bank notes enters the federal budget indirectly: New notes are purchased by the Federal Reserve from the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, a unit of the Treasury Department, at a price set to recover the Bureau's full cost of production.