intent

(redirected from intentness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

avowed intent

A solemn public promise or pledge toward some goal or achievement. The presidential nominee gave her avowed intent to reform the public school system should she be elected.
See also: intent

for all intents and purposes

In every practical or functional sense; almost completely. The phrase is often misstated as "for all intensive purposes." The app is finished, for all intents and purposes. We just need to iron out a few issues before it's released. For all intents and purposes, he's the leader of the organization. He just doesn't have the title.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

In every practical or functional sense; almost completely. To all intents and purposes, the gym is ready for tonight's dance. There's only a few small things we still need to do.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

intent on (doing something)

Determined to do something; set on doing something. I can't believe the invitations still aren't ready. It's like the printer is intent on ruining our wedding! She's intent on finishing her thesis this semester, but I just don't see how that's going to happen, with all the work she still needs to do.
See also: intent, on

loiter with intent

1. obsolete In law, to stand or wait idly in a location with the intent to commit an offence. Primarily heard in UK. The police officers arrested the two men, accusing them of loitering with intent to rob tourists coming out of the nearby pubs.
2. By extension, to stand idly in one spot while waiting for something to occur. Primarily heard in UK. We just had to stand there by the kerbside loitering with intent while we waited for him to pick us up.
See also: intent, loiter

for all intents and purposes

Cliché seeming as if; looking as if. Tom stood there, looking, for all intents and purposes, as if he could strangle Sally, but, being the gentleman that he is, he just glowered. Mary: Is the car washed now? John: For all intents and purposes, yes, but I didn't dry it yet.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

intent on doing something

determined to do something. The children were intent on making a snowman. The prisoner was intent on escaping.
See also: intent, on

to all intents and purposes

Also, for all intents and purposes; for all practical purposes. In every practical sense, virtually. For example, For all intents and purposes the case is closed, or For all practical purposes the Vice-President is the chief executive while the President is in the hospital . The first phrase, dating from the 1500s, originated in English law, where it was to all intents, constructions, and purposes. A shorter synonym is in effect, def. 1.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

COMMON You say to all intents and purposes to suggest that a situation is not exactly as you describe it but the effect is the same as if it were. To all intents and purposes he was my father. Note: People sometimes just say to all intents with the same meaning. For the first time in many years he was, to all intents, a free man.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

in all important respects.
1992 London Review of Books For if in 1976 pianists really were about to lose the skill of polyphonic piano-playing, then to all intents and purposes the skill of playing the piano was at an end.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

loiter with intent

stand or wait around with the intention of committing an offence. British
This is a legal phrase which derives from an 1891 Act of Parliament; it is also used figuratively and humorously of anyone who is waiting around for some unspecified purpose.
See also: intent, loiter

to all intents and ˈpurposes

(British English) (American English for all intents and ˈpurposes) in almost every important way: The fighting has stopped, so to all intents and purposes, the war is over.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose
References in periodicals archive ?
Such intentness is no less critical in the classrooms where immigrant children find themselves.
As O then settles, with both dejection and apprehension, into dozing off and rocking in a chair (that has two additional watching eyes in its headrest), E's face, which is O's "but with [a] very different expression, impossible to describe, neither severity nor benignity, but rather acute intentness (47)," purposely moves out of the angle of the safety zone to confront O with a direct and aggressive gaze.
The Indian gazed at the house, with that fierce intentness which sometimes glared, in a manner that had got to be, in its ordinary aspects, dull and besotted.
This desire for relaxation and mood improvement would not go easily with activities that require effort, intentness, alertness, or heavy demands, as would be the case for many projected interactive uses of television.
From the window ledge the famous Stuffed pheasant, our mascot, without assigning blame, Eyes us with an idiot's vacant intentness.
To quote North himself, music was not simply a favorite enjoyment, a "companion, and delight in all my solitudes as well as societys," but something much more, a congenial and challenging medium for his wide-ranging investigations of natural phenomena: "and as I ever bent my thoughts with more than ordinary intentness to search of truth in the way of physicks, it could not be expected, but I should take in my darling, as a subject to work upon" (quotations from Cursory Notes of Musicke, p.
68): "We can also ascertain that the intentness of the movements of the orbs of the eyes of all the visionaries is in perfect timing with each other at the beginning and end of the ecstasy.
Artful tripping is called heedful, not so much because the tripping involves action preceded by thought but because the behaviors patterned into the action of tripping suggest to the observer qualities such as "noticing, taking care, attending, applying one's mind, concentrating, putting one's heart into something, thinking what one is doing, alertness, interest, intentness, studying, and trying" (Ryle, 1949: 136).
Then, with great intentness, he says, "But it all wasn't a rosy picture by any means.
5 Giardini (Steve McQueen) Traduced as obvious and "phoned-in," but much the opposite: an isola of aesthetic intentness in a wan and soukish Venice Biennale.
This intentness reveals their puzzlement--what out there could possibly be worth someone's attention and film?
In an extraordinary passage toward the end, McIlvaine, whose own soul has been permanently roiled by the events he has witnessed and suffered, dreams of Sartorius observing with terrifying intentness a child's boat struggling in a heavy sea that soon takes it under.
This new handbook is welcome for the author's intentness, her learning, and her obvious relish for the opera.