intent

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avowed intent

A solemn public promise or pledge toward some goal or achievement. The presidential nominee gave her avowed intent to reform the public school system should she be elected.
See also: intent

for all intents and purposes

In every practical or functional sense; almost completely. The phrase is often misstated as "for all intensive purposes." The app is finished, for all intents and purposes. We just need to iron out a few issues before it's released. For all intents and purposes, he's the leader of the organization. He just doesn't have the title.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

In every practical or functional sense; almost completely. To all intents and purposes, the gym is ready for tonight's dance. There's only a few small things we still need to do.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

intent on (doing something)

Determined to do something; set on doing something. I can't believe the invitations still aren't ready. It's like the printer is intent on ruining our wedding! She's intent on finishing her thesis this semester, but I just don't see how that's going to happen, with all the work she still needs to do.
See also: intent, on

loiter with intent

1. obsolete In law, to stand or wait idly in a location with the intent to commit an offence. Primarily heard in UK. The police officers arrested the two men, accusing them of loitering with intent to rob tourists coming out of the nearby pubs.
2. By extension, to stand idly in one spot while waiting for something to occur. Primarily heard in UK. We just had to stand there by the kerbside loitering with intent while we waited for him to pick us up.
See also: intent, loiter

for all intents and purposes

Cliché seeming as if; looking as if. Tom stood there, looking, for all intents and purposes, as if he could strangle Sally, but, being the gentleman that he is, he just glowered. Mary: Is the car washed now? John: For all intents and purposes, yes, but I didn't dry it yet.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

intent on doing something

determined to do something. The children were intent on making a snowman. The prisoner was intent on escaping.
See also: intent, on

to all intents and purposes

Also, for all intents and purposes; for all practical purposes. In every practical sense, virtually. For example, For all intents and purposes the case is closed, or For all practical purposes the Vice-President is the chief executive while the President is in the hospital . The first phrase, dating from the 1500s, originated in English law, where it was to all intents, constructions, and purposes. A shorter synonym is in effect, def. 1.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

COMMON You say to all intents and purposes to suggest that a situation is not exactly as you describe it but the effect is the same as if it were. To all intents and purposes he was my father. Note: People sometimes just say to all intents with the same meaning. For the first time in many years he was, to all intents, a free man.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

in all important respects.
1992 London Review of Books For if in 1976 pianists really were about to lose the skill of polyphonic piano-playing, then to all intents and purposes the skill of playing the piano was at an end.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

loiter with intent

stand or wait around with the intention of committing an offence. British
This is a legal phrase which derives from an 1891 Act of Parliament; it is also used figuratively and humorously of anyone who is waiting around for some unspecified purpose.
See also: intent, loiter

to all intents and ˈpurposes

(British English) (American English for all intents and ˈpurposes) in almost every important way: The fighting has stopped, so to all intents and purposes, the war is over.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose
References in periodicals archive ?
As the seminar progressed, I realized that these people were intently focused on my every word.
Profit growth is expected to slow in 2007, debt balances are rising, and investors are likely to become more discriminating going forward, focusing more intently on risk/reward attributes in a maturing credit cycle.
Sure, a gallery is a great place to gaze intently at art and meet pensive, creative types.
Mendoza and other local softball stars will be watching intently from afar.
Dapretto's group proposes that the youngsters with autism intently scrutinized the details of each face photo in order to imitate what they saw because they were unable to discern the meaning of a facial expression and then use empathy to match it.
In the last 10 years, considering the lofty costs of Manhattan real estate, investors have focused more intently than ever on Hamilton and Washington Heights, according to M.
Rather than exploring various ways in which these instruments could be used, Streb focused intently on one type of action sequence for each.
I agree, but surely it requires a good deal of grit to play a five-set single at tennis in front of 15,000 people who are watching intently and not looking around at one another's clothes.
At ten minutes to the hour, gallery assistants gestured to the audience to stand; two hundred upturned faces watched Abramovic intently.
The puck ricocheted like a bullet into the bench and struck Julie Chu on the hip as she was leaning intently over the edge of the ice rink.
Knowing now that I was being braided into hairstory, I almost wish I had sat still a little longer, listened more intently to their stories, settled down to record in my own memory every one of those moments that, connected me to all the women who came before and since, and those who are on their way.
That's why we look intently at each individual case and treat the whole person, not just the illness.
Many of the show's stars were lobbying as intently as any K Street pro Monday night in Beverly Hills at the Museum of Television & Radio gala, which honored Wells and Peter Chernin, president of News Corp.
However, Rockmore focuses most intently on Bernhard Riemann, the mathematician whose hypothesis, proposed 150 years ago, continues to puzzle and fascinate mathematicians today.