intent

(redirected from intently)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

avowed intent

A solemn public promise or pledge toward some goal or achievement. The presidential nominee gave her avowed intent to reform the public school system should she be elected.
See also: intent

for all intents and purposes

In every practical or functional sense; almost completely. The phrase is often misstated as "for all intensive purposes." The app is finished, for all intents and purposes. We just need to iron out a few issues before it's released. For all intents and purposes, he's the leader of the organization. He just doesn't have the title.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

intent on (doing something)

Determined to do something; set on doing something. I can't believe the invitations still aren't ready. It's like the printer is intent on ruining our wedding! She's intent on finishing her thesis this semester, but I just don't see how that's going to happen, with all the work she still needs to do.
See also: intent, on

loiter with intent

1. obsolete In law, to stand or wait idly in a location with the intent to commit an offence. Primarily heard in UK. The police officers arrested the two men, accusing them of loitering with intent to rob tourists coming out of the nearby pubs.
2. By extension, to stand idly in one spot while waiting for something to occur. Primarily heard in UK. We just had to stand there at the kerbside loitering with intent while we waited for him to pick us up.
See also: intent, loiter

to all intents and purposes

In every practical or functional sense; almost completely. To all intents and purposes, the gym is ready for tonight's dance. There's only a few small things we still need to do.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

for all intents and purposes

Cliché seeming as if; looking as if. Tom stood there, looking, for all intents and purposes, as if he could strangle Sally, but, being the gentleman that he is, he just glowered. Mary: Is the car washed now? John: For all intents and purposes, yes, but I didn't dry it yet.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

intent on doing something

determined to do something. The children were intent on making a snowman. The prisoner was intent on escaping.
See also: intent, on

to all intents and purposes

Also, for all intents and purposes; for all practical purposes. In every practical sense, virtually. For example, For all intents and purposes the case is closed, or For all practical purposes the Vice-President is the chief executive while the President is in the hospital . The first phrase, dating from the 1500s, originated in English law, where it was to all intents, constructions, and purposes. A shorter synonym is in effect, def. 1.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

COMMON You say to all intents and purposes to suggest that a situation is not exactly as you describe it but the effect is the same as if it were. To all intents and purposes he was my father. Note: People sometimes just say to all intents with the same meaning. For the first time in many years he was, to all intents, a free man.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

to all intents and purposes

in all important respects.
1992 London Review of Books For if in 1976 pianists really were about to lose the skill of polyphonic piano-playing, then to all intents and purposes the skill of playing the piano was at an end.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

loiter with intent

stand or wait around with the intention of committing an offence. British
This is a legal phrase which derives from an 1891 Act of Parliament; it is also used figuratively and humorously of anyone who is waiting around for some unspecified purpose.
See also: intent, loiter

to all intents and ˈpurposes

(British English) (American English for all intents and ˈpurposes) in almost every important way: The fighting has stopped, so to all intents and purposes, the war is over.
See also: all, and, intent, purpose

all intents and purposes, for (to)

In practical terms; virtually. Since intent and purpose mean the same thing, the term is a tautology. According to Eric Partridge, it has been a cliché since the mid-nineteenth century. It originated in English law in the 1500s, when it was even more long-windedly phrased, to all intents, constructions and purposes.
See also: all, and, intent
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the survey, companies are watching employees' spending more intently on both sides of the Atlantic.
As one of Sun's long standing Elite Software Integration partners, we're also delighted to see that Sun has listened intently to partners, and our customers, and has implemented many of our recommendations," said Martin Gee CTO at ICSynergy.
However, the young couple had been listening intently. I saw a look of admiration on their faces.
She stares intently into McKenzie's large painted eyes.
Throats cleared, tears fell on cheeks, palms curled up into balls as those in the circle listened intently to the firm yet soothing voice of Ms.
Their bodies, intently outlined and punctuated with color, at once realistic and stylized, conform to the contours of the cave, the cracks and imperfections of which are often incorporated in the drawing.
To those investors wishing to follow Buffett's approach to investing, Hagstrom suggests: "...expand your circle of competence by studying intently the business models of the companies participating in the New Economy landscape..." Investors who are less willing to spend time understanding business might want to consider indexing their money in a low-cost mutual fund instead.
According to the New York Times account, UN Secretary-General Annan listened intently for three and a half hours as the veteran internationalists discussed falling public confidence in both the world body and its top official.
It's for all of these reasons that BE will focus even more intently on motivating African Americans to buy their first homes, and to get them to take this important wealth-building step as early in their lives as possible.
The young Army specialist listened intently to Sursely's words, asking questions about what to expect in the future.
They were consequently free to focus intently on an individual's conversion experience--a common denominator of evangelicalism.
Ashton choreographed Scenes de Ballet in 1948 for Margot Fonteyn and Michael Somes, but his intently literal rendition of Stravinsky's irregular rhythms worked against him; Balanchine knew that Stravinsky's pauses also allowed for choreography.
WE SEE A STIRRED-UP CROWD OF PEOPLE intently taking the dead Jesus from the cross and lowering him into his mother Mary's lap.