intense

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intense

slang Serious or severe, perhaps to an overwhelming degree. That war movie was way too intense—I had to turn it off. Whoa, that accident sounds intense! Are you OK?

crash course (in something)

a short and intense training course in something. I took a crash course in ballroom dancing so we wouldn't look stupid on the dance floor.
See also: course, crash

crash course

A short, intensive training course, as in Daisy planned to take a crash course in cooking before she got married. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: course, crash

intense

mod. serious; heavy. Oh, wow! Now that’s what I call intense!
References in periodicals archive ?
Though Wordsworth's gloss on the poem emphasizes the "moment when the intenseness of his mind is beginning to remit," the poetic lines obscure that lapse.
intensity: State or quality of being intense; intenseness; extreme degree; as, intensity of heat, cold, or light.
She hates him with an intensive intenseness and yet I think he's cute.
"One of the big things coach Pettibone instilled in me was the recruiting process, and the work ethic that it takes to recruit, and the other factors, as far as trying to get a team ready every week, coming off a couple of lean years, and the intenseness of the rivalry with Oregon," Hoke said.
Some idea of the intenseness of the combat on Iwo Jima might be realized when you know that of 27 Medals of Honor awarded to Marines and sailors, 13 were given posthumously.
"I still play pool because I can forget the intenseness of snooker.
Just as the intenseness of my green eyes gazed back at me, so did the posture that I saw as grotesque and horrible.
'Who, when he first saw the sand and ashes by a casual intenseness of heat melted into metalline form, rugged with excrescences and clouded with impurities, would have imagined that in this shapeless lump lay concealed so many conveniences of life as would, in time, constitute a great part of the happiness of the world?' Dr Johnson, the English eighteenth-century savant, was remarkably perceptive about the nature of glass that, as he pointed out, is a 'body at once in a high degree solid and transparent; which might admit the light of the sun, and exclude the violence of the wind'.
Then he launches into his life history with an articulate intenseness. He obviously wants his message to be heard and spells out the high and low points with equal bluntness.