insult

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Related to insultingly: insulted

add insult to injury

To exacerbate an already problematic situation in a way that is humiliating; to make someone who has just experienced injury or defeat feel worse about the situation with one's words. A: "Well, it's not like you were having a great season before you broke your leg." B: "Thanks for adding insult to injury." I was already late for work and, to add insult to injury, I spilled coffee all over myself.
See also: add, injury, insult

an insult to one is an insult to all

The belief that, when one person in a group is insulted, the insult extends to everyone in that group. A: "Was I rude to her? Yeah, probably—but I didn't mean it as a slight against everyone who's in a wheelchair!" B: "Maybe not, but you're a prominent politician. From the media's perspective, an insult to one is an insult to all." Just remember that most of the people in this neighborhood are Polish, and an insult to one is an insult to all.
See also: all, insult, one

fire insults at (one)

To insult one in rapid succession. That bully is constantly firing insults at the other kids in class.
See also: fire, insult

fire questions at (one)

To rapidly ask one questions. Can you please not fire questions at me as soon as I get home from work?
See also: fire, question

hurl insults (at one)

To insult one in rapid succession. That bully is constantly hurling insults at the other kids in class.
See also: hurl, insult

throw (something) back and forth

1. To take turns tossing something between one another. My son and I discussed a lot of things while we threw the baseball back and forth in the back yard. The bullies stole the girl's stuffed animal and threw it back and forth above her head.
2. To discuss various ideas, points, arguments, etc., with one another. We all sat around the table and threw ideas for a new product back and forth. We started something of an informal debate about the topic, throwing arguments and counterpoints back and forth for the duration of the class.
3. To alternate making verbal attacks, insults, quips, etc., at one another. My dad and my boyfriend kept throwing snide remarks back and forth throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. The two presidential candidates spent the entirety of the debate throwing insults back and forth.
See also: and, back, forth, throw

throw insults (at one)

To say insulting, petulant things (directly to one). The student threw insults at her teacher after she got an F on her assignment. She made such a conclusive argument during the debate that all her opponent could do was resort to throwing insults.
See also: insult, throw

toss (something) back and forth

1. To take turns throwing something lightly or casually between one another. My son and I discussed a lot of things while we tossed the baseball back and forth in the back yard. The bullies stole the girl's stuffed animal and tossed it back and forth above her head.
2. To discuss various ideas, points, arguments, etc., with one another. We all sat around the table and tossed ideas for a new product back and forth. We started something of an informal debate about the topic, tossing arguments and counterpoints back and forth for the duration of the class.
3. To alternate making verbal attacks, insults, quips, etc., at one another. My dad and my boyfriend kept tossing snide remarks back and forth throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. The two presidential candidates spent the entirety of the debate tossing insults back and forth.
See also: and, back, forth, toss

trade insults (with one)

To alternate saying insulting things (with one). My dad and my boyfriend kept trading insults throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. She traded insults with her opponent for the whole debate.
See also: insult, trade

add insult to injury

Fig. Cliché to make a bad situation worse; to hurt the feelings of a person who has already been hurt. First, the basement flooded, and then, to add insult to injury, a pipe burst in the kitchen. My car barely started this morning, and to add insult to injury, I got a flat tire in the driveway.
See also: add, injury, insult

hurl insults (at someone)

 and throw insults (at someone)
Fig. to direct insults at someone; to say something insulting directly to someone. Anne hurled an insult at Bob that made him very angry. If you two would stop throwing insults, we could have a serious discussion.
See also: hurl, insult

throw insults

(at someone) Go to hurl insults (at someone).
See also: insult, throw

trade insults (with someone)

to take turns with someone in mutual insulting. We traded insults with each other for a while and then settled down to some serious discussions of our differences.
See also: insult, trade

add insult to injury

Hurt a person's feelings after doing him or her harm; also, make a bad situation worse. For example, Not only did the club refuse him, but it published a list of the rejected applicants-that's adding insult to injury , or The nearest parking space was half a mile away, and then, to add insult to injury, it began to pour : The phrase is an ancient one, even older than its often cited use in the Roman writer Phaedrus's fable of the bald man and the fly. A fly bit the head of a bald man, who, trying to crush it, gave himself a heavy blow. The fly then jeered, "You want to avenge an insect's sting with death; what will you do to yourself, who have added insult to injury?" In English it was first recorded in 1748.
See also: add, injury, insult

add insult to injury

COMMON If someone or something adds insult to injury, they make a bad situation worse by doing or causing another bad thing. She stood there and made him wash every part of his body. She then added insult to injury by trimming his hair and making him wear a linen shirt several sizes too big for him. Birth is such a shock, and what usually follows adds insult to injury. The poor little thing is held upside down and slapped. Note: You can use to add insult to injury or adding insult to injury to introduce a further unpleasant thing that has happened and that you are reporting. The driver of the car that killed Simon Collins got away with a £250 fine. To add insult to injury, he drove away from court in his own car.
See also: add, injury, insult

add insult to injury

do or say something that makes a bad or displeasing situation even worse.
This phrase comes from Edward Moore's play The Foundling ( 1748 ): ‘This is adding insult to injuries’.
See also: add, injury, insult

add ˌinsult to ˈinjury

make a bad relationship with somebody worse by offending them even more: She forgot to send me an invitation to her party and then added insult to injury by asking to borrow my jacket!
See also: add, injury, insult

fire ˈquestions, ˈinsults, etc. at somebody

ask somebody a lot of questions one after another or make a lot of comments very quickly: The room was full of journalists, all firing questions at them.
See also: fire, somebody

add insult to injury, to

To make harm worse by adding humiliation. The phrase has been traced to a Greek fable about a bald man. Trying to kill a fly on his head, he misses and hits himself very hard, and the fly replies, “You wanted to kill me for merely landing on you; what will you do to yourself now that you have added insult to injury?” It has since been applied to countless situations by as many writers, and has long been a cliché.
See also: add, insult
References in periodicals archive ?
Destination Freedom, a stirring and innovative radio program of the late 1940s that dramatized the lives of successful and historically significant Black men and women, stood as a beacon of enlightenment in an era when insultingly distorted depictions of Blacks--not to mention discrimination -- were rampant.
We have insultingly low levels of prize-money for the majority of races, growing demands of regulation coming out of the BHA and pathetic support from the National Trainers Federation for a campaign to put in place a business structure that gives both trainers and owners a fair return.
There have, of course, been wars of one sort or another ever since, including the Falklands, which history has insultingly deemed as a "conflict," despite the sacrifice of British troops, because war was never formally declared.
The insultingly trivial "Brexit means Brexit" mantra has been used as a substitute for constructive thought, and the lady whose gurus devised it has deservedly got her comeuppance.
He said it was "unacceptable and belittling for the media to publish a letter of which I am the recipient before it has been delivered to me." The implication of this practice was that the Auditor-general was working on the assumption that his observations would be ignored and was imposing pressure "insultingly, and by threat of the mass media," concluded the minister.
More basic tips: Scripted spiels are OK for starters, but all TV talents should make it a point to learn how to ad-lib and eventually think and speak for themselves, thus making the insultingly called idiot boards obsolete.
This funding gap is likely to exceed PS3.6bn by 2025, according to the Nuffield Trust, despite money being periodically "found" for insultingly paltry "investments" in the continuous day-to-day running of this vital service.
"Drivers who have killed while taking illegal risks have too often been labelled 'careless' in the eyes of the law, and given insultingly low sentences, when their actions can only be described as dangerous and destructive."
His dad Jamal (Bijan Daneshmand) believes it was the handiwork of businessman Gregor Forrester (Ray Fearon) who owns the plot of land next to the Khans' house and didn't take it all that well when they turned down his offer to buy their property for an insultingly low price.
"And now we have the revelation of huge delays in dealing with compensation claims which the Government insultingly describes as reflecting a compensation culture on the part of men and women who may risk their lives in the course of serving their country."
Most insultingly, ignoring its proud record of displaying local artists such as William Tillyer as well as Lowry, Picasso and even a Top Gear exhibition, Preston criticises the gallery for its lack of "mass interest art."
Because this was an insultingly moronic attempt at titillation.
The Israeli mayor of occupied Jerusalem, Nir Barkat, recently said that its Arab residents should forget about ever having a capital in occupied Jerusalem and insultingly suggested that they rename Ramallah, as "Jerusalem" or "north Jerusalem".
Likewise the sloping plank of wood they insultingly call a seat.
Wiz asked: "Are we steadfastly putting in insultingly low offers in the hope that because we are business whizzes they will buckle and accept?" TerryTibbs agreed: "I believe that the players we sign haven't even been mentioned yet, that's how these guys do things.