insult

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add insult to injury

To exacerbate an already problematic situation in a way that is humiliating; to make someone who has just experienced injury or defeat feel worse about the situation with one's words. A: "Well, it's not like you were having a great season before you broke your leg." B: "Thanks for adding insult to injury." I was already late for work and, to add insult to injury, I spilled coffee all over myself.
See also: add, injury, insult

an insult to one is an insult to all

The belief that, when one person in a group is insulted, the insult extends to everyone in that group. A: "Was I rude to her? Yeah, probably—but I didn't mean it as a slight against everyone who's in a wheelchair!" B: "Maybe not, but you're a prominent politician. From the media's perspective, an insult to one is an insult to all." Just remember that most of the people in this neighborhood are Polish, and an insult to one is an insult to all.
See also: all, insult, one

fire insults at (one)

To insult one in rapid succession. That bully is constantly firing insults at the other kids in class.
See also: fire, insult

fire questions at (one)

To rapidly ask one questions. Can you please not fire questions at me as soon as I get home from work?
See also: fire, question

hurl insults (at one)

To insult one in rapid succession. That bully is constantly hurling insults at the other kids in class.
See also: hurl, insult

throw (something) back and forth

1. To take turns tossing something between one another. My son and I discussed a lot of things while we threw the baseball back and forth in the back yard. The bullies stole the girl's stuffed animal and threw it back and forth above her head.
2. To discuss various ideas, points, arguments, etc., with one another. We all sat around the table and threw ideas for a new product back and forth. We started something of an informal debate about the topic, throwing arguments and counterpoints back and forth for the duration of the class.
3. To alternate making verbal attacks, insults, quips, etc., at one another. My dad and my boyfriend kept throwing snide remarks back and forth throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. The two presidential candidates spent the entirety of the debate throwing insults back and forth.
See also: and, back, forth, throw

throw insults (at one)

To say insulting, petulant things (directly to one). The student threw insults at her teacher after she got an F on her assignment. She made such a conclusive argument during the debate that all her opponent could do was resort to throwing insults.
See also: insult, throw

toss (something) back and forth

1. To take turns throwing something lightly or casually between one another. My son and I discussed a lot of things while we tossed the baseball back and forth in the back yard. The bullies stole the girl's stuffed animal and tossed it back and forth above her head.
2. To discuss various ideas, points, arguments, etc., with one another. We all sat around the table and tossed ideas for a new product back and forth. We started something of an informal debate about the topic, tossing arguments and counterpoints back and forth for the duration of the class.
3. To alternate making verbal attacks, insults, quips, etc., at one another. My dad and my boyfriend kept tossing snide remarks back and forth throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. The two presidential candidates spent the entirety of the debate tossing insults back and forth.
See also: and, back, forth, toss

trade insults (with one)

To alternate saying insulting things (with one). My dad and my boyfriend kept trading insults throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. She traded insults with her opponent for the whole debate.
See also: insult, trade

add insult to injury

Fig. Cliché to make a bad situation worse; to hurt the feelings of a person who has already been hurt. First, the basement flooded, and then, to add insult to injury, a pipe burst in the kitchen. My car barely started this morning, and to add insult to injury, I got a flat tire in the driveway.
See also: add, injury, insult

hurl insults (at someone)

 and throw insults (at someone)
Fig. to direct insults at someone; to say something insulting directly to someone. Anne hurled an insult at Bob that made him very angry. If you two would stop throwing insults, we could have a serious discussion.
See also: hurl, insult

throw insults

(at someone) Go to hurl insults (at someone).
See also: insult, throw

trade insults (with someone)

to take turns with someone in mutual insulting. We traded insults with each other for a while and then settled down to some serious discussions of our differences.
See also: insult, trade

add insult to injury

Hurt a person's feelings after doing him or her harm; also, make a bad situation worse. For example, Not only did the club refuse him, but it published a list of the rejected applicants-that's adding insult to injury , or The nearest parking space was half a mile away, and then, to add insult to injury, it began to pour : The phrase is an ancient one, even older than its often cited use in the Roman writer Phaedrus's fable of the bald man and the fly. A fly bit the head of a bald man, who, trying to crush it, gave himself a heavy blow. The fly then jeered, "You want to avenge an insect's sting with death; what will you do to yourself, who have added insult to injury?" In English it was first recorded in 1748.
See also: add, injury, insult

add insult to injury

COMMON If someone or something adds insult to injury, they make a bad situation worse by doing or causing another bad thing. She stood there and made him wash every part of his body. She then added insult to injury by trimming his hair and making him wear a linen shirt several sizes too big for him. Birth is such a shock, and what usually follows adds insult to injury. The poor little thing is held upside down and slapped. Note: You can use to add insult to injury or adding insult to injury to introduce a further unpleasant thing that has happened and that you are reporting. The driver of the car that killed Simon Collins got away with a £250 fine. To add insult to injury, he drove away from court in his own car.
See also: add, injury, insult

add insult to injury

do or say something that makes a bad or displeasing situation even worse.
This phrase comes from Edward Moore's play The Foundling ( 1748 ): ‘This is adding insult to injuries’.
See also: add, injury, insult

add ˌinsult to ˈinjury

make a bad relationship with somebody worse by offending them even more: She forgot to send me an invitation to her party and then added insult to injury by asking to borrow my jacket!
See also: add, injury, insult

fire ˈquestions, ˈinsults, etc. at somebody

ask somebody a lot of questions one after another or make a lot of comments very quickly: The room was full of journalists, all firing questions at them.
See also: fire, somebody

add insult to injury, to

To make harm worse by adding humiliation. The phrase has been traced to a Greek fable about a bald man. Trying to kill a fly on his head, he misses and hits himself very hard, and the fly replies, “You wanted to kill me for merely landing on you; what will you do to yourself now that you have added insult to injury?” It has since been applied to countless situations by as many writers, and has long been a cliché.
See also: add, insult
References in periodicals archive ?
At the outset of al-Sarim al-maslul, Ibn Taymiyya provides a brief and unsatisfying account of the views of the Shafi'i school on the non-Muslim insulter of the Prophet.
Prouprou Lambert: [...] nous sommes pas la pour parler du traintrain quotidien mais pour nous INSULTER !!!!!!
On the one hand, such behaviour may seem a good illustration of Nathan's evaluation of Lousteau relative to the later episode of the provocatively indiscreet birth announcements: "il s'insulte lui-meme quand il ne sait plus qui insulter..." (763).
Three weeks under way went by without remedy to the insult, as the "insulter" was ignorant to the harm caused.
Nobody's armor is strong enough to sustain such an educated insulter onslaught--especially as each designer believes his/her baby is the company's next cash cow.
(2) He also discussed serious news items on Imus in the Morning, and while some people condemned his brand of comedy, others considered him an intelligent and "equal-opportunity insulter" because he made all kinds of people the objects of his humor.
"He's an equal opportunities insulter. I knew a lot of guys like him, so this guy just seemed like a real person.
(17) In medieval Welsh society, like other societies that practiced feud, to insult a woman was considered an assault against her husband and her male relatives, since by calling into question their ability to defend their women, the insulter at once implied their impotence and questioned their honour.
To say nothing of James Watt, despoiler of the environment and insulter of nearly everybody, including explicitly the Jews in both ethnic and political references.
suffit-il pas a insulter ces corps reduits par le long corset,
It is thy insulter (and not thou) who is without posterity." (A verse from Surah Al Kawthar, in the Holy Qur'an.)Some were even holding placards with the name of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) written across a large red heart.
"If you deflect it with humor, you allow the insulter to see how juvenile such commentary can be." You could say to Jen, "Speed-eating is nothing--I'm actually setting a world record for fly consumption!