insult

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Related to insulted: insultingly, flouts

add insult to injury

To exacerbate an already problematic situation in a way that is humiliating; to make someone who has just experienced injury or defeat feel worse about the situation with one's words. A: "Well, it's not like you were having a great season before you broke your leg." B: "Thanks for adding insult to injury." I was already late for work and, to add insult to injury, I spilled coffee all over myself.
See also: add, injury, insult

an insult to one is an insult to all

The belief that, when one person in a group is insulted, the insult extends to everyone in that group. A: "Was I rude to her? Yeah, probably—but I didn't mean it as a slight against everyone who's in a wheelchair!" B: "Maybe not, but you're a prominent politician. From the media's perspective, an insult to one is an insult to all." Just remember that most of the people in this neighborhood are Polish, and an insult to one is an insult to all.
See also: all, insult, one

fire insults at (one)

To insult one in rapid succession. That bully is constantly firing insults at the other kids in class.
See also: fire, insult

fire questions at (one)

To rapidly ask one questions. Can you please not fire questions at me as soon as I get home from work?
See also: fire, question

hurl insults (at one)

To insult one in rapid succession. That bully is constantly hurling insults at the other kids in class.
See also: hurl, insult

throw (something) back and forth

1. To take turns tossing something between one another. My son and I discussed a lot of things while we threw the baseball back and forth in the back yard. The bullies stole the girl's stuffed animal and threw it back and forth above her head.
2. To discuss various ideas, points, arguments, etc., with one another. We all sat around the table and threw ideas for a new product back and forth. We started something of an informal debate about the topic, throwing arguments and counterpoints back and forth for the duration of the class.
3. To alternate making verbal attacks, insults, quips, etc., at one another. My dad and my boyfriend kept throwing snide remarks back and forth throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. The two presidential candidates spent the entirety of the debate throwing insults back and forth.
See also: and, back, forth, throw

throw insults (at one)

To say insulting, petulant things (directly to one). The student threw insults at her teacher after she got an F on her assignment. She made such a conclusive argument during the debate that all her opponent could do was resort to throwing insults.
See also: insult, throw

toss (something) back and forth

1. To take turns throwing something lightly or casually between one another. My son and I discussed a lot of things while we tossed the baseball back and forth in the back yard. The bullies stole the girl's stuffed animal and tossed it back and forth above her head.
2. To discuss various ideas, points, arguments, etc., with one another. We all sat around the table and tossed ideas for a new product back and forth. We started something of an informal debate about the topic, tossing arguments and counterpoints back and forth for the duration of the class.
3. To alternate making verbal attacks, insults, quips, etc., at one another. My dad and my boyfriend kept tossing snide remarks back and forth throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. The two presidential candidates spent the entirety of the debate tossing insults back and forth.
See also: and, back, forth, toss

trade insults (with one)

To alternate saying insulting things (with one). My dad and my boyfriend kept trading insults throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. She traded insults with her opponent for the whole debate.
See also: insult, trade
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

add insult to injury

Fig. Cliché to make a bad situation worse; to hurt the feelings of a person who has already been hurt. First, the basement flooded, and then, to add insult to injury, a pipe burst in the kitchen. My car barely started this morning, and to add insult to injury, I got a flat tire in the driveway.
See also: add, injury, insult

hurl insults (at someone)

 and throw insults (at someone)
Fig. to direct insults at someone; to say something insulting directly to someone. Anne hurled an insult at Bob that made him very angry. If you two would stop throwing insults, we could have a serious discussion.
See also: hurl, insult

throw insults

(at someone) Go to hurl insults (at someone).
See also: insult, throw

trade insults (with someone)

to take turns with someone in mutual insulting. We traded insults with each other for a while and then settled down to some serious discussions of our differences.
See also: insult, trade
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

add insult to injury

Hurt a person's feelings after doing him or her harm; also, make a bad situation worse. For example, Not only did the club refuse him, but it published a list of the rejected applicants-that's adding insult to injury , or The nearest parking space was half a mile away, and then, to add insult to injury, it began to pour : The phrase is an ancient one, even older than its often cited use in the Roman writer Phaedrus's fable of the bald man and the fly. A fly bit the head of a bald man, who, trying to crush it, gave himself a heavy blow. The fly then jeered, "You want to avenge an insect's sting with death; what will you do to yourself, who have added insult to injury?" In English it was first recorded in 1748.
See also: add, injury, insult
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

add insult to injury

COMMON If someone or something adds insult to injury, they make a bad situation worse by doing or causing another bad thing. She stood there and made him wash every part of his body. She then added insult to injury by trimming his hair and making him wear a linen shirt several sizes too big for him. Birth is such a shock, and what usually follows adds insult to injury. The poor little thing is held upside down and slapped. Note: You can use to add insult to injury or adding insult to injury to introduce a further unpleasant thing that has happened and that you are reporting. The driver of the car that killed Simon Collins got away with a £250 fine. To add insult to injury, he drove away from court in his own car.
See also: add, injury, insult
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

add insult to injury

do or say something that makes a bad or displeasing situation even worse.
This phrase comes from Edward Moore's play The Foundling ( 1748 ): ‘This is adding insult to injuries’.
See also: add, injury, insult
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

add ˌinsult to ˈinjury

make a bad relationship with somebody worse by offending them even more: She forgot to send me an invitation to her party and then added insult to injury by asking to borrow my jacket!
See also: add, injury, insult

fire ˈquestions, ˈinsults, etc. at somebody

ask somebody a lot of questions one after another or make a lot of comments very quickly: The room was full of journalists, all firing questions at them.
See also: fire, somebody
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

add insult to injury, to

To make harm worse by adding humiliation. The phrase has been traced to a Greek fable about a bald man. Trying to kill a fly on his head, he misses and hits himself very hard, and the fly replies, “You wanted to kill me for merely landing on you; what will you do to yourself now that you have added insult to injury?” It has since been applied to countless situations by as many writers, and has long been a cliché.
See also: add, insult
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
As an engineer, it insulted me through its argument which had no technical or intellectual basis.
"Then he insulted me by saying, 'We're doing an A-Team movie, but we want to use other guys for the characters, but we'll find a part for you'.
The adoration many Thai citizens felt for the late King Bhumibol, expressed through the near certainty of seeing pictures of the monarch on the walls of homes, restaurants and taxis throughout the nation of nearly 70 million people, has for some turned into bitter anger toward those who have allegedly insulted the monarchy in the aftermath of his death last week.
In one message, Mutua insulted a friend and asked them to keep off his Facebook posts.
Ramallah: A Jewish colonist woman who insulted the Prophet Mohammad (PBUH) on tape and stated to a crowd of Palestinian Murabiteen in Al Haram Al Sharif that "Mohammad is a pig" has been given heroic treatment in Israeli media.
New Delhi, Apr.5 ( ANI ): The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) on Saturday strongly defended party general secretary Amit Shah's 'apmn ka badla lenge' remark, saying that both the Uttar Pradesh Government and those who had visited Muzaffarnagar for 'secular tourism' had insulted the riots victims.
There have been several incidents since Bahrain's political unrest began in February 2011, in which His Majesty was insulted in speeches
Can an individual file a lawsuit if she or he feels insulted but others do not believe so?
"Dahi Khalfan asked me to open a complaint in CID because the defendant insulted him on his Twitter account," a 35-year-old Emirati policeman said in records.
"I have never felt worse in my life because the handball players played with teams that had nothing to do with Albanians, yet they still insulted them.
The referee in yesterday's match, Jeff Selogilwe, claimed he was insulted by Rooney - whom he said apologised afterwards - and told the Manchester United striker he will risk getting a red card if he behaves in a similar way when the World Cup gets under way.
I have never insulted any footballer or been insulted by a footballer
Robredo, claiming that she is used to be being insulted, also stressed that it is her obligation as Vice President to attend the President's annual address to the nation.
The 27-year-old man sliced off the finger of the retired GCC national after he insulted his mother.
Journalists and public figures critical of the government in particular have been targeted by the police and prosecutors on the grounds that they have insulted the head of state.