inkhorn term

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inkhorn term

An obscure term from another language (most often Latin or Greek), typically used in an attempt to highlight the speaker's intelligence. I can't stand that guy and his inkhorn terms—I feel like I need to have a dictionary on hand just to talk to him!
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dekker asserts that writers have a heraldry and a crest of their own: the "heraldry" of the writer is the name of his patron, and the "crest" of the writer is a pen and inkhorn. Dekker places his work under the protection of his putative patron by virtue of the dedication, and his language suggests that this practice is a common one ("general errors have general pardons"), a practice understood by both writer and dedicatee.
Much of the vehemence of both the inkhorn and spelling reform controversies stems from an underlying and powerful sense of Englishness, and how to preserve and safeguard it from possible foreign corruption.
(15.) Emerson had initially invited Fuller to Concord to complete the essay review, promising to reserve for her "desk & inkhorn ...
According to Puttenham, inkhorn terms and words borrowed from "strangers" can only please the vulgar crowd, the common people, who prefer interludes and popular drama, just as they enjoy the jangling rhymes of "Cantabanqui" and "blind harpers" (96-97).
792), and with it the whole representational order of romantic signs and symbolizations.(24) Similarly, in 2 Henry VI the clowns--performing under the actual names of George Bevis and John Holland, two Shakespearean actors--can aggressively indulge in threatening gestures of a grotesque type of resistance against the literate/clerical culture of "pen and inkhorn" (4.2.106), there identified with the more oppressive uses of literacy in law and jurisdiction.
These defined what could be called "inkhorn terms"--commotrix ("a maid that makes ready and unready her Mistris"), parentate ("to celebrate one's parents' funerals"), and gargari ("to wash or scowre the mouth with any Physicall liquor")--far too learned for everyday discourse.
(2) Riddles involving writing in the Exeter Book include the following: "Book" (in some form) (26, 67, 88, 95), "Inkhorn" (88, 93), "Quill Pen and Fingers" (51), "Reed Pen/ Rune-staff" (60), inscribed items (48, 59), and "Book-moth" (47).
Translating Plutarch's text gave him the opportunity to display his fluency in the classical languages (especially Greek, from which he quotes liberally) and translation skills (particularly his copious knowledge of synonyms, including many 'inkhorn' terms, for example 'relucent and esclarished' (sig.
Larded with pretentious inkhorn terms ("processually," "identitarian," "equivalential," "counterhegemonic," "celebrityness," "hierachicalizing," "heteronormative," "historicalities," "multidimentional positionality," "reparameterizes," "subfluxation," "biunivocal," "subjunctified," "non-state-promoting entities," "Marlowespace") and marred by lapses in grammar and euphony, this analysis invites us to "tango with [alternative] perspectives" as reflected in "materialist and constructivist accounts" of "Mary/Moll" "as a means by which to chasse into our own alternative theoretical understanding of deviant identity formations" (66-67).
Similar tactics characterize the "inkhorn controversy" between Samuel Daniel and Thomas Nash, each of whom accuses the other, in pretentious neologisms, of infecting English with pretentious neologisms.
The utopia designed by Cade is an absurd attempt for reversing time and history, similar to the frightening world imagined by Borges in his "Utopia of a Tired Man" ("Utopia de un hombre que esta cansado"), in which the nameless inhabitant of the future declares, "Printing--which is now abolished since it tended to multiply unnecessary texts to the point of dizziness--was one of man's worst evils." (11) The clerk of Chartham, whose name itself is a permanent reminder of oppressive written culture, since Emmanuel means "God with us", a formula frequently used as heading for legal documents, will be hanged "with his pen and inkhorn about his neck."
Riddle 93, commonly solved "Inkhorn," lines 24b-25a, "Nu ic blace swelge / wuda ond waetre" (Now I swallow the black one / ink, the wood and water).
Perhaps the most accurate aim taken at the target of this collection is by Paula Blank, in her essay "`niu reiting': The prose of language reform in the English Renaissance." Blank links the eruption of language reform tracts in the seventeenth century to an increasing anxiety over crime and social decay, showing how "inkhorn terms," or neologisms, were associated with the cant of the cutpurse classes.
From Guerinot, we learn that in November 1716, for example, a pseudonymously authored pamphlet attacks among Pope's other works the parody of the First Psalm and alleges that Pope's "inkhorn overflows with Blasphemy." With "grossest abuse" - the description is Guerinot's - this writer claims that Pope's work betrays "aversion both to God and Man." Less than two months later Pope is charged with licentiousness and blasphemy in The Evening Post of 22 January 1717.
From Guerinot, we learn that in November 1716, for example, a pseudonymously authored pamphlet attacks among Pope's other works the parody of the First Psalm and alleges that Pope's "inkhorn overflows with Blasphemy." With "grossest abuse"--the description is Guerinot's--this writer claims that Pope's work betrays "aversion both to God and Man." Less than two months later Pope is charged with licentiousness and blasphemy in The Evening Post of 22 January 1717.