inclined to

inclined to

Tending or disposed toward, as in I'm inclined to give him the benefit of the doubt. [Mid-1300s]
See also: inclined
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes pondering over this, I am in some degree inclined to their opinion.
He was of a fat habit, even from boyhood, and inclined to a cheerful and cursory reading of the face of life; and possibly this attitude of mind was the original cause of his misfortunes.
Nor is there, perhaps, more of truth in the opinion of those who derive the partiality which women are inclined to show to the brave, from this excess of their fear.
The mistress of the house was moved with compassion, and inclined to have let me go, and had almost persuaded her husband to it also, but the saucy wenches were run, even before they were sent, and had fetched a constable, and then the master said he could not go back, I must go before a justice, and answered his wife that he might come into trouble himself if he should let me go.
Some approached pure blanching; some had a bluish pallor; some worn by the older characters (which had possibly lain by folded for many a year) inclined to a cadaverous tint, and to a Georgian style.
If he were inclined to resist the summons, he would fall or be made to fall a second or third time.
To-night I feel inclined to allow my choice to be directed by sentiment; and as we are on so pretty a pilgrimage, would it not be appropriate to drink Liebfraumilch?
And it's very pleasant to go among the tenants here-- they seem all so well inclined to me I suppose it seems only the other day to them since I was a little lad, riding on a pony about as big as a sheep.
In her present altered frame of mind, she was inclined to think that Sir Jervis might be the more interesting correspondent of the two.
Vanstone further explained that she had perhaps been the more inclined to adopt it through having been always accustomed, in her early days, to see the captain living now upon one member, and now upon another, of her mother's family.
Following some such principle, I am inclined to regard the singular Castle of Coningsburgh I mean the Saxon part of it as a step in advance from the rude architecture, if it deserves the name, which must have been common to the Saxons as to other Northmen.
And in practice there is little reason to apprehend any inconvenience; because, in a short course of time, the wants of the States will naturally reduce themselves within A VERY NARROW COMPASS; and in the interim, the United States will, in all probability, find it convenient to abstain wholly from those objects to which the particular States would be inclined to resort.
From certain vague memories I am inclined to think my own mind wandered at times.
True, you say that she is inclined to grumble, but do not mind that, Barbara.
A short period before the arrival of the first Pilgrims at Plymouth there had been a very grievous plague among the red men; and the sages and ministers of that day were inclined to the opinion that Providence had sent this mortality in order to make room for the settlement of the English.