in (someone's or something's) way

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in (someone's or something's) way

Obstructing someone or interfering in something. If you leave your science project in my way, I can't guarantee I won't step on it! She's so determined that I just know nothing will get in her way, and she'll finish her thesis.
See also: way
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*in someone's way

 
1. Lit. in the pathway of someone. (*Typically: be ~; get [into] ~; stand ~.) Don't get in Bob's way while he is bringing groceries in from the car.
2. and in the way of someone('s plans) Fig. interfering with a person in the pursuit of plans or intentions; hindering someone's plans. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; Stand ~.) I am going to leave home. Please don't get in my way. She intends to become a lawyer and no one had better get in her way. I would never get into the way of her plans.
See also: way

in someone's (or something's) way

 and in the way of someone or something
Fig. in the pathway or movement of someone or something. Don't get in my way. That car is in the way of the bus and all the other traffic.
See also: way
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in one's way

1. Also, in one's own way. According to one's personal manner. For example, She's brusque but kind in her own way, or Both of them are generous in their way. This phrase is often used to limit an expression of praise, as in the examples. [c. 1700]
2. Also, put in one's way; put in the way of. Before one, within reach or experience, as in That venture put an unexpected sum of money in my way, or He promised to put her in the way of new business. [Late 1500s]
3. in someone's way Also, in the way. In a position to obstruct, hinder, or interfere with someone or something. For example, That truck is in our way, or You're standing in the way; please move to one side. [c. 1500]
See also: way
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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