out of wedlock

(redirected from in wedlock)

out(side) of wedlock

Without being married to the other person in question. I know my grandparents raised their eyebrows when my girlfriend and I had our son out of wedlock, but they've never been rude about it. Back in my day, it was pretty unheard of to even live with someone outside of wedlock.
See also: of, wedlock

out of wedlock

Of parents not legally married, as in Over the centuries many royal children were born out of wedlock. The noun wedlock, for the state of being married, is rarely heard today except in this phrase, first recorded in 1675; its converse, in wedlock, dates from the 1300s and is even more rarely used.
See also: of, out, wedlock

out of wedlock

Of parents not legally married to each other: born out of wedlock.
See also: of, out, wedlock
References in classic literature ?
But though Mrs Miller did not refrain from a short expostulation in private at their first meeting, yet the occasion of his being summoned downstairs that morning was of a much more agreeable kind, being indeed to perform the office of a father to Miss Nancy, and to give her in wedlock to Mr Nightingale, who was now ready drest, and full as sober as many of my readers will think a man ought to be who receives a wife in so imprudent a manner.
I stand a wretch, in birth, in wedlock cursed, A parricide, incestuously, triply cursed!
Though shocked and disappointed, I decided to remain in wedlock with him.
ISLAMABAD -- Justice Amir Hani Muslim has remarked a woman being a Muslim has every right of separation from her spouse if she does not like him and does not want to stay in wedlock with him.
Children were chattel of their fathers if born in wedlock, and chattel of their mothers if born out-of wedlock.
Prior to 1947, Canadian women who married non-British status men lost their Canadian status upon marriage; children were considered "property" of their fathers if born in wedlock, and property of their mothers if born out-of wedlock.
With Justice Powell writing for the majority, the Court stated that while strict scrutiny does not apply to classifications based on legitimacy, "[i]n a case like this, the Equal Protection Clause requires more than the mere incantation of a proper state purpose." (118) A state may classify children as born out of wedlock or in wedlock. However, when a state discriminates against the children based on the classification, such discrimination "depends upon the character of the discrimination and its relation to legitimate legislative aims." (119)
I contend that the North Carolina statute violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, which "prohibits a state from granting rights to one class of citizens that are denied to another class of citizens." (137) "The definition of discrimination can be reduced to the idea that one person can have something [that] another person cannot have, and the only difference between the two is a specific characteristic." (138) Children born in wedlock have an automatic right to inheritance from their paternal relatives; children born out of wedlock do not.
Courts that have interpreted the Fourteenth Amendment and parallel clauses in state constitutions have held that "legislation may discriminate among classes as long as the burden imposed on the affected class is justifiable." (141) Although the distinction between "illegitimate" and "legitimate" children does not rise to the level of strict scrutiny, the United States Supreme Court used the standard of intermediate scrutiny in Trimble and Lalli and stated that intestate statutes that discriminate between children born in wedlock and out of wedlock must bear some substantial relationship to a legitimate state interest.
which governs citizenship by descent for children born in wedlock, makes
problems: it is generally clear when a child is born in wedlock and
being born in wedlock generally implies being biologically related to
Expensive weddings, lavish honeymoons and platinum wedding rings will all be cast aside as the proportion of couples in wedlock drops to 42% in 2033, down 7% on the latest statistics.
Such an offspring was termed a "natural child" (filho natural) and, in certain circumstances, he or she qualified as an heir, along with children born in wedlock and other relatives so born.
Currently, children born in wedlock are registered as ''eldest son'' or ''eldest daughter'' and so on, but those born out of wedlock are registered as simply ''female'' or ''male.''