in trouble with

in trouble with (someone)

In someone's disfavor due to a particular offense or wrongdoing, especially one that will result in punishment. I'm in trouble with my parents for sneaking out last night. You'll be in trouble with Mrs. Johnson if you don't hand in your book report on time.
See also: trouble
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in trouble with

In difficulties with someone, especially an authority. For example, If they don't shovel their walk, they'll be in trouble with their neighbors. This idiom is also put as get in or into trouble with , as in Watch what you say or you'll get into trouble with the teacher. [Mid-1500s] Also see hot water; in a fix.
See also: trouble
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although the violence in the film mostly occurs off-screen, its implied glass-eating scene got the film in trouble with the Hollywood Code watchdogs.
A legal permanent resident, he was raised in America and did well until high school when he got in trouble with a gang.
But he was a clean-cut boy who attended school and had never been in trouble with the law.
Many players had previously been in trouble with the law, with some arrested for car theft, vandalism and shoplifting.
Player Dean Horseman, 14, said: "It was a really good way of stopping youngsters from getting in trouble with the police.