in (one's) face

(redirected from in their face)

in (one's) face

1. Physically in front of one's face. If you stick that dead bug in my face, I'm going to come after you! Can you believe he just slammed the door in my face like that?
2. slang Aggressively unavoidable; thrust upon one's attention. I hate talking to opinionated people—their views are always in your face. I hate all these pop-up ads in my face when I'm just trying to look something up.
3. slang Aggressively interacting with one. The phrase typically implies physical proximity. The salesmen are going to be in your face the moment you walk in the door, so remember to say you're just browsing. The ref was right to eject him—he was in his face the whole game!
4. An aggressive exclamation of triumph said after the speaker has defeated one or proven one wrong. Although rude, the phrase is often used jocularly, without actual hostility. You said I wouldn't make the team, and guess who's the newest member of the pitching staff? Yeah, that's right, in your face! I told Janet I would get that promotion before she did. In her face!
See also: face

in your face

1. interjection An aggressive exclamation of triumph said after one has defeated someone or proven someone wrong. Although rude, the phrase is often used jocularly, without actual hostility. You said I wouldn't make the team, and guess who's the newest member of the pitching staff? Yeah, that's right, in your face! I beat you, just as I predicted—in your face!
2. adjective Overtly aggressive, especially in an attempt to garner attention, interest, etc. Typically hyphenated. I don't think an in-your-face advertising campaign will work in this case. We need something more subtle. People hate buying cars because the salespeople are way too in-your-face. Nancy's in-your-face attitude will serve her well in the business world.
See also: face

*in someone's face

Sl. in a provocative attitude, as if ready to fight or argue. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) Ted's a real pain. He likes to get in your face. He'll argue about anything. I know you are angry, hut don't get in my face. I had nothing to do with it.
See also: face

in your face

Defiantly confrontational; also, an exclamation of contempt. For example, This show is not suitable for youngsters; its attitude about sex is in your face, or In your face, mister! This slangy expression originated in the 1970s in basketball as a phrase of contempt used against the opposing team and was extended to other areas by the mid-1980s.
See also: face

in your face

aggressively obvious; assertive. informal
1996 Sunday Telegraph The…campaign reflects a growing trend of aggressive and ‘in your face’ advertisement that is alarming many within the industry.
See also: face

in your face

Rudely confrontational; an expression of extreme contempt. This impolite phrase apparently originated in basketball in the 1970s, where it would be used against one’s opponents. By the 1980s it had been extended to other kinds of confrontation, where it calls up the belligerent gesture of putting one’s own face close to the other person’s. However, the term also is used merely to describe something that is quite obvious. It was so used in a Boston Globe editorial (Feb. 2, 2005) about a Harvard professor who made a career of looking into things just because they are interesting: “He said that what excites him ‘are things so in your face that almost no one thinks about them.’” The equally slangy get out of my face, for “stop bothering me,” originated in black English ca. 1930.
See also: face