in the wake of somebody/something

in the wake of something

Fig. after something; as a result of some event. (Alludes to a ship's wake.) We had no place to live in the wake of the fire. In the wake of the storm, there were many broken tree limbs.
See also: of, wake

in the wake of

1. Following directly on, as in In the wake of the procession, a number of small children came skipping down the aisle. This usage alludes to the waves made behind a passing vessel. [c. 1800]
2. In the aftermath of, as a consequence of, as in Famine often comes in the wake of war. [Mid-1800s]
See also: of, wake

in the wake of something

COMMON If an event, especially an unpleasant one, follows in the wake of a previous event, it happens after the earlier event, often as a result of it. The trouble at Shotts prison follows in the wake of unrest at several prisons in England. He remained in office until 1985 when he resigned in the wake of a row with the Socialist government.
See also: of, something, wake

in the wake of somebody/something

coming after and resulting from somebody/something; behind somebody/something: Disease began spreading in the wake of the floods.The tourists left all sorts of rubbish in their wake. OPPOSITE: in advance (of something)
As a ship moves through the water, it leaves a wake (= disturbed water) behind it.
See also: of, somebody, something, wake

in the wake of

1. Following directly on.
2. In the aftermath of; as a consequence of.
See also: of, wake