in the saddle


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in the saddle

1. In control; in a dominant or influential position. Likened to literally sitting in a saddle to ride a horse. With the new CEO in the saddle, the company has turned in its most profitable quarter in years.
2. Having resumed a previous activity, especially after illness or injury. I need to take today off to deal with this cold, but I should be back in the saddle on Monday.
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in the saddle

If someone is in the saddle, they are in control of an organization. Now that he is firmly in the saddle, Vaghela will be looking to strengthen his position further. Their plan would sell 55 per cent of the new stock to the company's majority shareholders, putting them in the saddle.
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in the saddle

1 on horseback. 2 in a position of control or responsibility.
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in the saddle

1. Prevailing or in control; dominant: "The crisis [in Russia] came to a head when the American-backed reformers were in the saddle" (Michael R. Gordon).
2. Engaged in an activity, especially a job: back in the saddle after a leave of absence from work.
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in the saddle

In a position of authority. This term dates from the seventeenth century, or perhaps even earlier. Machiavelli in his famous discourse on politics, The Prince (trans. 1675), wrote, “Such as by the favour of fortune . . . have got into the saddle.” It was misinterpreted by one writer, R. G. White (England Without and Within, 1881), who said, “The phrase ‘in the saddle,’ as an expression of readiness for work, is a peculiarly English phrase.” In fact, it has always meant a position of authority, not necessarily come by through honest toil.
See also: saddle