in the driver's seat


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Related to in the driver's seat: Passenger Seat

in the driver's seat

In control; in a dominant or influential position. With the new CEO in the driver's seat, the company has turned in its most profitable quarter in years.
See also: seat
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in the driver's seat

Fig. in control; in charge of things. (As if one were driving and controlling the vehicle.) Now that Fred is in the driver's seat, there is a lot less criticism about how things are being done. Joan can't wait to get into the driver's seat and do what she can to turn things around.
See also: seat
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in the driver's seat

Also, in the saddle. In control, in a position of authority. For example, With the boss on vacation, Mr. Burns was in the driver's seat and enjoying it, or She waited until after the election, knowing that she'd be in the saddle then. The first expression dates from the 1800s, the second from the early 1600s. Also see at the helm.
See also: seat
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in the driver's (or driving) seat

in charge of a situation.
1998 Times The deal would propel the no-nonsense Lancastrian into the driving seat at the UK's biggest generator.
See also: seat
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in the driver’s seat

mod. in control. I’m in the driver’s seat now, and I get to decide who gets raises.
See also: seat
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

in the driver's seat

In control. The analogy here is obvious, but the actual expression did not become common until the nineteenth century. Lord Beaverbrook is quoted (New Statesman, 1963) as saying of David Lloyd George, “He did not care in which direction the car was travelling, so long as he remained in the driver’s seat.” See also in the saddle.
See also: seat
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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