in the back

in the back

1. In an area physically behind or at the back of something else. We keep those items in the back of the store—here, let me show you.
2. In a particular area that only some people, often employees, have access to. That coffeemaker is completely out of stock—we don't even have any in the back. Jason's in the back—do you want me to get him for you?
See also: back

in the back

in the back part of a building; in the back room of a building. I don't have your size here, but perhaps I can find it in the back. He's not in the shop right now. I'll see if he's in the back.
See also: back
References in classic literature ?
Gedge, the landlord of the Royal Oak, who used to turn a bloodshot eye on his neighbours in the village of Shepperton, sum up his opinion of the people in his own parish--and they were all the people he knew--in these emphatic words: "Aye, sir, I've said it often, and I'll say it again, they're a poor lot i' this parish--a poor lot, sir, big and little." I think he had a dim idea that if he could migrate to a distant parish, he might find neighbours worthy of him; and indeed he did subsequently transfer himself to the Saracen's Head, which was doing a thriving business in the back street of a neighbouring market-town.
Three men approached the vehicle as the 29-year-old woman sat in the front and her two-year-old girl sat in the back.
He sees them all trained there and then he hears what's going on in the back room.
It involves the fatal shooting of a Mexican worker by a Border Patrol agent in Arizona, who, another agent charged, had shot the man in the back and left him to die.