in the air


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in the air

In one's and/or others' awareness; evident in the immediate surroundings. There was a buzz in the air at the festival, and it was all due to the return of the legendary bluesman. Pumpkins, apple cider, falling leaves. Fall is in the air!
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in the air

Fig. everywhere; all about. There is such a feeling of joy in the air. We felt a sense of tension in the air.
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in the air

In addition to the following idiom, also see castles in the air; leave hanging (in the air); nose in the air; up in the air.

in the air

1. In circulation, in people's thoughts. For example, There's a rumor in the air that they're closing, or Christmas is in the air. [Second half of 1800s] Also see in the wind.
2. See up in the air. [Mid-1700s]
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in the air

COMMON If something such as a change, idea, or feeling is in the air, people are aware of it or think it is going to happen even though it is not talked about directly. I might never have said `Yes', if it hadn't been for the sense that political change was in the air. Great excitement was in the air that week in London. As the band plays, and with romance in the air, Mr. Li recalls how he came to Panzhihua.
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(up) in the ˈair

(of plans, etc.) uncertain; not yet decided: Our plans for the summer are still very much up in the air.At the end of the meeting, the matter was left in the air.
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in the ˈair

(of an idea, a feeling, a piece of information, etc.) felt by a number of people to exist or to be happening: Spring is in the air.There was a strong feeling of excitement in the air.
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in the air

Abroad; prevalent: Excitement was in the air.
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