in (someone's or something's) stead

(redirected from in stead)

in (someone's or something's) stead

As the representative of someone or something; in place of someone or something. (Typically used in slightly more formal language.) The boss isn't here at the moment, but I'd be happy to sign for the package in her stead. My horse was stolen, so I am forced to ride this donkey in its stead.
See also: stead

in somebody’s/something’s ˈstead

(formal) instead of somebody/something: Foxton was dismissed and John Smith was appointed in his stead.
See also: stead
References in periodicals archive ?
James Mussell (Chapter 2) and Alexis Easley (Chapter 3) deftly examine two of the major threads in Stead's journalism.
However, in Stead's earlier career as a newspaper editor, firstly on the Northern Echo (1871 to 1880) and then at the Pall Mall Gazette (1883 to 1889), belatedness and provisionality were pressing problems.
The lines written in Lady Brooke's hand authorized those lines written by her in Stead's--but Stead had to wait until the lines of the rails brought him back to London before he knew for sure.
"Today we have come across a team playing with energy and power, with two strikers in Stead and Davies we couldn't handle."
A further and perhaps more significant reason, I will argue here, is the changes in Stead's writing, as she took on a more critical stance in her fiction.
The changes in Stead's later fiction have been described by Hazel Rowley as a 'metamorphosis': 'angrier, more relentless than ever, [it] did not appeal to 1950s war-scarred sensibilities,' but 'confronted readers with poverty, corruption and self-deception.' (28) Stead's agent did not like these novels.
Bees have so far remained tight-lipped on speculation that one World Cup rider in Stead could be replaced by another in Eastbourne's Edward Kennett.
Town are playing down interest in Stead, manager Peter Jackson saying the club has not received any bids for the player and adding it would take a `huge' offer to prise Stead away from the McAlpine Stadium.
No other work appeared until 1965, when The Man Who Loved Children, long out of print, was reissued, launching a second phase in Stead's career.
Yet she is persuasive in locating its sources in Stead's early family life and in suggesting how and why it was reactivated later on.
The first was the completion of a neat move among the bacKs which resulted in Stead taKing the final pass to go over in the corner before adding the extras.