in someone's shoes

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in (one's) shoes

Sharing a particular experience or circumstance with someone else. It's easy to mock someone else until you've lived in their shoes for a while. As hard as it is to live with a disability, remember that you're not alone—a lot of other people are in your shoes, too.
See also: shoe

in someone's shoes

Also, in someone else's shoes; in someone's place or stead . Acting for another person or experiencing something as another person might; in another's position or situation. For example, If you were in my shoes, would you ask the new secretary for a date? or In your shoes I wouldn't accept the offer, or Can you go to the theater in my place? or He was speaking in her stead. The idioms alluding to shoes, with their image of stepping into someone's shoes, date from about 1700 and are generally used in a conditional clause beginning with if. Stead, dating from the 1300s, and place, from the 1500s, are used more loosely. Also see fill someone's shoes; put someone in his or her place; take someone's place.
See also: shoe

in someone's shoes

COMMON If you talk about being in someone's shoes, you are describing how you would feel or act if you were in the same situation as them. Stop and think how you would feel if you were in his shoes. If I were in her shoes, I'd probably want an explanation. If you were in his shoes what would you do? Note: You can also say that you wouldn't like to be in someone's shoes, meaning that you would not like to be in the same situation as them. I wouldn't like to be in Bryce's shoes when Kathy finds out what he's done.
See also: shoe
References in periodicals archive ?
The candle will be lit at the In Someone Else's Shoes holocaust memorial event which starts at 6.
Remember, you can't walk in someone else's shoes if you never get out of your chair.
Readers are asked to ponder whether such questions as whether consciousness is related to musical taste, and whether it's ever possible to put yourself in someone else's shoes.
called "Walk a Mile in Someone Else's Shoes," that raised $6,000 for the PWRDF HIV/AIDS project.
This involved standing in someone else's shoes and knowing how they felt.
This is our way of letting the kids see what it's like to be in someone else's shoes.
To enter BIC's contest, teachers are asked to submit student essays (of 200 words or less) with the theme: "If I could walk in someone else's shoes, who would it be and why?
The show places participants in arranged scenarios enabling them to experience life in someone else's shoes.