in other words


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in other words

A phrase used to indicate that one is about to restate something in a different way, typically to clarify or simplify it. A number of factors have combined to obfuscate a reliable assessment of the situation. In other words, we don't know what we don't know. A: "It will be a challenge to make the playoffs at this point." B: "In other words, we're all but out of it."
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in other words

a phrase introducing a restatement of what has just been said. Henry: Sure I want to do it, but how much do I get paid? Andrew: In other words, you're just doing it for the money. Bill: Well, I suppose I really should prepare my entourage for departure. Bob: In other words, you're leaving? Bill: One could say that, I suppose. Bob: Why didn't one?
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in other words

Putting it differently, usually more simply or explicitly. For example, The weather was terrible, the plane took off several hours after the scheduled time, and then fog prevented their landing-in other words, they never got to the wedding at all . [Mid-1800s]
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in ˈother words

expressed in a different way; that is to say: ‘I don’t think this is the right job for you, Pete.’ ‘In other words, you want me to leave. Is that it?’
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References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, Juan Miguel Gonzalez has almost never been out of sight of his Cuban overseers since his arrival in the United States, a circumstance that continues to raise questions about his free agency.
In other words, at the same time that Thomas was asking the INS to verify the immigration status of new voters, the administration was promoting a project that supposedly could verify the immigration status of new workers.
Explaining why her stories didn't make the front page of Business--let alone the A section--Horwitz says, "It wasn't really considered news because there was no official recall and no official investigation." In other words, the Post provides little incentive for an enterprising reporter to pursue the story of a dangerous product before people actually get hurt and the feds decide to hold hearings.
In other words, the rush to citizenship started before the GOP-controlled Congress said its first word about immigrants.
If a private business were confronted with this problem, it might choose to out-source the work - in other words, pay someone else to do it.
In other words, it has no quality-control mechanism to prevent the buying and selling of answers.
In other words, they translate themselves and their projects into the language and theater of crisis.
In other words, he was taking actions designed to manipulate public perceptions and actions in his favor merely by virtue of being covered as authentic actions.