in one ear and out the other


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in one ear and out the other

Essentially ignored, dismissed, or forgotten almost immediately after being heard (as of something spoken). My instructions to my kids are often in one ear and out the other, especially if they have their phone in front of them. I have to remind my students a dozen times to copy down their homework—it's like in one ear and out other. You can try to convince him, but with him it's usually in one ear and out the other.
See also: and, ear, one, other, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in (at) one ear and out (of) the other

Prov. heard but not remembered. (Used to describe something that someone does not listen to.) Ellen: Did you tell Junior to be careful with the car when he drives it? Fred: Yes, but I think it went in one ear and out the other. The teacher felt that everything she told her students was in one ear and out the other.
See also: and, ear, one, other, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in one ear and out the other

Quickly forgotten, as in Their advice to her just went in one ear and out the other. This expression, a proverb in John Heywood's 1546 collection, conjures up a graphic image of sound traveling through one's head. [Late 1300s]
See also: and, ear, one, other, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in one ear and out the other

heard but disregarded or quickly forgotten.
See also: and, ear, one, other, out
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in one ear and out the other

Without any influence or effect; unheeded: His mind was made up, so my arguments went in one ear and out the other.
See also: and, ear, one, other, out
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in one ear and out the other

Inattentive; soon forgotten. This vivid image dates from Roman times. “The things he says flow right through the ears,” wrote Quintillian (Institutionis Oratoriae, ca. a.d. 80). The sentiment was echoed by Chaucer and joined John Heywood’s 1546 proverb collection (“Went in the tone eare, and out at the tother”). Thomas Hood punned on it in his “Ode to the Late Lord Mayor” (1825): “He comes in at one year, to go out by the other!”
See also: and, ear, one, other, out
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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