in (one's) shoes

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in (one's) shoes

Sharing a particular experience or circumstance with one. It's easy to mock someone else until you've lived in their shoes for a while. As hard as it is to live with a disability, remember that you're not alone—a lot of other people are in your shoes, too.
See also: shoe
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in someone's shoes

Also, in someone else's shoes; in someone's place or stead . Acting for another person or experiencing something as another person might; in another's position or situation. For example, If you were in my shoes, would you ask the new secretary for a date? or In your shoes I wouldn't accept the offer, or Can you go to the theater in my place? or He was speaking in her stead. The idioms alluding to shoes, with their image of stepping into someone's shoes, date from about 1700 and are generally used in a conditional clause beginning with if. Stead, dating from the 1300s, and place, from the 1500s, are used more loosely. Also see fill someone's shoes; put someone in his or her place; take someone's place.
See also: shoe
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in someone's shoes

COMMON If you talk about being in someone's shoes, you are describing how you would feel or act if you were in the same situation as them. Stop and think how you would feel if you were in his shoes. If I were in her shoes, I'd probably want an explanation. If you were in his shoes what would you do? Note: You can also say that you wouldn't like to be in someone's shoes, meaning that you would not like to be in the same situation as them. I wouldn't like to be in Bryce's shoes when Kathy finds out what he's done.
See also: shoe
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012
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