in loco parentis


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in loco parentis

Responsible for a child's wellbeing while his or her parents are absent. Does being a teacher ever make you nervous, having to be in loco parentis to so many young kids?
See also: loco

in ˌloco paˈrentis

(from Latin, formal) having the same responsibility for a child as a parent has: Teachers at a boarding school are acting much more in loco parentis than at a day school.The Latin phrase means in the place of a parent.
See also: loco
References in periodicals archive ?
Another example of in loco parentis can be found in the training for educators offered by several school districts around the country based on a book intended to help middle-class educators effectively teach economically poor children.
Leacy was in loco parentis at the time - it was a breach of trust JUDGE MORAN
The issue of whether the husband had intended to treat the children as his own was referred back to the trial judge with a direction that if, on examination of the nature of the family relationship, the husband was found to be in loco parentis, then retroactive child support could be ordered.
If she in fact is the central parental figure in the child's life and is responsible for their day-to-day care and financial support, she is said to have "in loco parentis" status, which means she stands in the place of a parent.
A statement from the GTC said: "Part of a teacher's role and responsibility, being in loco parentis, is to uphold moral standards for children in their care.
Previously, America's universities had operated under the doctrine of in loco parentis ("in the place of a parent").
It disappoints me that we would have to do that, but the fact is we are in loco parentis and we have to ensure the children's safety.
If Kerry did have an affair with a very young woman entitled to see him as in loco parentis, isn't his heroic image tarnished?
Administrators sanctioning confidential visits to the campus clinic for birth control and STD tests were a far cry from the in loco parentis model, the norm on campus in the 1950s and early '60s when colleges and universities were surrogate parents, monitoring dormitory visits and providing social chaperones.
In his 1770 compilation of English law, William Blackstone applied the phrase in loco parentis to educators.
This principle has only one exception: when the grandparent stands in loco parentis to the grandchild, that is, stands in the place of the natural parent.(5) Even then, the grandparent's child support liability is secondary to that of the parent, who retains the primary duty to support the child.
Suddenly they are in loco parentis for other campers.
The teacher's job, acting in loco parentis, is to drill virtue into students by word and example.