in like a lion, out like a lamb

in like a lion, out like a lamb

Used to describe the weather in March in the northern hemisphere, where it tends to be very harsh and unpleasant in the beginning but milder and more palatable at the end. A shortening of the full phrase, "March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb." A: "I just wanted this awful cold weather to be over!" B: "It shouldn't be much longer now. March always comes in like a lion, but it goes out like a lamb." I know, I know, in like a lion, out like a lamb—but spring still can't come fast enough!
See also: lamb, like, out

March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb

Because March straddles winter and spring in the northern hemisphere, it tends to have very harsh, unpleasant weather in the beginning but typically has milder, more palatable weather by the end. The phrase is often rearranged, separated, or otherwise slightly reworded. A: "I just wanted this awful cold weather to be over!" B: "It shouldn't be much longer now. March always comes in like a lion, but it goes out like a lamb." March usually goes out like a lamb, but it's been a lion from beginning to end this year!
See also: and, come, goes, lamb, like, lion, march, out