in hot pursuit (of someone or something)

(redirected from in hot pursuit of)

in hot pursuit (of someone or something)

Chasing or pursuing someone or something very closely or with great energy or zeal. The suspect was seen fleeing down Main Street with police in hot pursuit. They've been in hot pursuit of an Olympic gold medal for the last eight years.
See also: hot, pursuit, someone

in hot purˈsuit (of somebody/something)

chasing somebody; trying to catch somebody: He grabbed the jewels and ran, with several customers in hot pursuit.
See also: hot, pursuit
References in periodicals archive ?
MOLLIE King from The Saturdays spent the Capital FM Summertime ball afterparty in hot pursuit of Justin Timberlake - even dragging her American boyfriend Jordan Omley along with her.
OBSESSED Z Mollie heads to parties in hot pursuit of Justin
Using the Hubble Space Telescope, two teams have been in hot pursuit of some of the coolest objects in the universe.
The attorney general, herself a former chief prosecutor for Miami, knows that the government cannot break into a private home and seize a human being without a warrant specifically authorizing the seizure, unless in hot pursuit of a fleeing felon.
4) the officers are in hot pursuit of that suspect.
Police officers who are in hot pursuit of a criminal suspect are not required to stop in their tracks and seek a warrant before entering a residence into which the suspect has just fled.
Despite the fact that the officers stopped in the midst of the chase and went back to police headquarters, the court still deemed that the officers were in hot pursuit of the killer.(9) The Llaguno court balanced the officers' interest in preventing escape or injury against the privacy interest of the resident and had little difficulty in finding that the officers were faced with an emergency.
The court found that, even though the officers were in hot pursuit of the bank robber, they only had a reasonable suspicion that the robber was in any of the rooms; they did not have the requisite probable cause.
Supreme Court ruled that the officers were not in hot pursuit of the defendant because 1) she was not fleeing from the officers; 2) she was completely surrounded by the police before she knew of their presence; and 3) she made no attempt to escape.(13) Just because police officers are moving swiftly does not mean that they are in hot pursuit.
The state of Wisconsin contended that the warrantless search of the home was reasonable on three grounds: 1) the officers were in hot pursuit of the suspect; 2) the defendant posed a threat to public safety; and 3) there was an emergency need to ascertain the driver's blood-alcohol level.
If officers are in hot pursuit of a suspect who has committed only a misdemeanor, would they be able to make a warrantless entry in order to arrest the suspect?
After all, it was the Web that brought the shopping malls, the advertisers, the financial real estate, indeed the entire world of commercial agents in hot pursuit of good addresses from which to promote and shop their wares.
I cannot envision that 'berg in hot pursuit of the ship any more than I can some duck ready to go one-on-one with one of Boeing's biggest.
US SPECIAL forces have been given the go-ahead to cross the Syrian border with Iraq if they are in hot pursuit of Saddam Hussein.
Every last one is entirely a product of Steinberg's wizardry, of an imagination in hot pursuit of the bizarre effect which unexpectedly turns out to be true to life.