in hot pursuit


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in hot pursuit (of someone or something)

Chasing or pursuing someone or something very closely or with great energy or zeal. The suspect was seen fleeing down Main Street with police in hot pursuit. They've been in hot pursuit of an Olympic gold medal for the last eight years.
See also: hot, pursuit, someone

in hot purˈsuit (of somebody/something)

chasing somebody; trying to catch somebody: He grabbed the jewels and ran, with several customers in hot pursuit.
See also: hot, pursuit
References in periodicals archive ?
Police officers who are in hot pursuit of a criminal suspect are not required to stop in their tracks and seek a warrant before entering a residence into which the suspect has just fled.
I cannot envision that 'berg in hot pursuit of the ship any more than I can some duck ready to go one-on-one with one of Boeing's biggest.
With the tables suddenly turned, the robbers ran out the front door and down three flights of stairs as Burnett, in hot pursuit, fired a number of shots.
US SPECIAL forces have been given the go-ahead to cross the Syrian border with Iraq if they are in hot pursuit of Saddam Hussein.
Every last one is entirely a product of Steinberg's wizardry, of an imagination in hot pursuit of the bizarre effect which unexpectedly turns out to be true to life.
As he rounded the corner of the family chicken coop, Daniel saw Bessie scampering toward him with a large, very angry grizzly bear in hot pursuit. Fearing that he and the dog would be seriously harmed, or worse, he fired two blasts from a distance of about 20 yards, mortally wounding the grizzly.
When one of the trio, later identified as 18-year-old Francis Dalton, fired a shot through a window of Cho's car, the terrified small businessman sped up and raced three blocks with his assailants in hot pursuit before pulling into the parking lot of a check-cashing business.