in (one's) mind's eye

(redirected from in her mind's eye)

in (one's) mind's eye

In one's imagination or mind, especially referring to something that is being visualized. Before I write a scene, I try to visualize it in my mind's eye, to see how everyone is situated.
See also: eye
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in one's mind's eye

Fig. in one's mind or imagination. (Alludes to visualizing something in one's mind.) In my mind's eye, I can see trouble ahead. In her mind's eye, she could see a beautiful building beside the river. She decided to design such a building.
See also: eye
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in one's mind's eye

In one's imagination or memory. For example, I can just see the old farm in my mind's eye. This term pairs mind and eye in the sense of "a mental view." [Early 1400s]
See also: eye
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in your mind's eye

COMMON If you see something in your mind's eye, you have a clear picture of it in your imagination or memory. Susie had a clear picture in her mind's eye of how she wanted the house to look. In my mind's eye, he's in his twenties — but he's probably a lot older.
See also: eye
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

in your mind's eye

in your imagination or mental view.
See also: eye
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in your ˌmind’s ˈeye

as a picture in your mind or in your imagination: I can see his face quite clearly in my mind’s eye.Try to picture in your mind’s eye the scene that day.
See also: eye
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

mind's eye, in my

In my imagination. This figure of speech dates from the early fifteenth century. Thomas Hoccleve used it in De Regimine Principium (1412): “Haue often him byfore your myndes ye.” So did Shakespeare in Hamlet’s statement to Horatio that he thinks he sees his dead father: “In my mind’s eye” (Hamlet, 1.2).
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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