in eclipse

in eclipse

Dwindling in success, popularity, or relevance. (Typically used in slightly more formal language.) Sure, that author was big 10 years ago, but her career is in eclipse now, and I doubt her new book will be a big seller.
See also: eclipse

in eclipse

FORMAL
If something is in eclipse, it is much less successful and important than it used to be. The Socialist party, which has spent most of the past 21 years in government, is now in eclipse. Since then, his career has been mostly in eclipse. Note: An eclipse of the sun is an occasion when the moon is between the earth and the sun, so that for a short time you cannot see part or all of the sun. An eclipse of the moon is an occasion when the earth is between the sun and the moon, so that for a short time you cannot see part or all of the moon because it is covered by the shadow of the earth.
See also: eclipse

in eclipse

1 (of a celestial object) obscured by another or the shadow of another. 2 losing or having lost significance, power, or prominence.
2 1991 Atlantic Within a decade of his death…he was in eclipse: not written about, undiscussed, forgotten in architecture schools.
See also: eclipse
References in periodicals archive ?
This addresses one of the top architectural issues in Eclipse by enabling developers to create Eclipse projects within another project to provide
(7) As the eclipses are long in duration (>50d), and deep (~2 mv), this leads to the possibility of detecting this variation in eclipse width using simple visual photometry, following established procedures used by variable star observers.
This is to be expected as the intrinsic brightness of the hot component adds to the overall brightness of the system even when in eclipse, as the surrounding environment of the binary system is illuminated by the hot component, and as this extends beyond the eclipsing source it is not affected by the eclipse.
It has been shown that from relatively basic visual photometry, details in eclipse profiles in V1413 Aquilae can be seen to vary from one eclipse to another, with variable widths and depths of eclipse as well as slightly asymmetrical decline and recovery times.
Early maps were spare in eclipse details, meaning they did not include features such as curves of equal magnitude or contact times.
In fact, a 1976 annular eclipse over Santorini described by Michael Maunder and Patrick Moore in The Sun in Eclipse (1998) generated no response from that Aegean island's inhabitants because it passed unnoticed.